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Opera: Microsoft trying to escape antitrust probe

CEO says software company is forcing EU's hand

Opera software has slammed Microsoft's decision to strip its Internet Explorer browser from Windows 7, claiming the company is trying to set its own antitrust remedy.

Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Opera Software said Microsoft was forcing the European Commission's hand.

Opera complained to the Commission about the bundling of IE in Windows in 2007. The complaint sparked an antitrust probe that resulted in formal charges of monopoly abuse in January this year.

The Commission is now formulating a remedy that would include the creation of a ballot screen containing a selection of browsers for users to choose from when they install Windows on their new computers.

Von Tetzchner said such a remedy is just as important now as it was before Microsoft announced the plan to unbundle IE from the new version of the OS.

Microsoft, however, is trying to derail the process by offering a version of Windows without a browser, said Von Tetzchner. "They are trying to replicate the remedy in the media player case, which we all know didn't work."

"If Microsoft got its way there would be no ballot screen, just a version of Windows that has no browser at all - just like the edition 'n' of Windows that resulted from the earlier European antitrust case," he said.

In that case in 2004, the Commission ruled that Microsoft had distorted competition in the market for media players by bundling its Windows Media Player into Windows. It ordered the software giant to sell a version of Windows that had the media player stripped out, as well as selling the fully bundled version of Windows.

The ruling didn't insist on a price differential between the two versions. Microsoft complied, launching Windows edition 'n' which, not surprisingly, bombed in the market.

The Commission doesn't want to make the same mistake this time, in its remedy for restoring competition in the browser market, and rival browser makers are insistent that there must be no repeat of the edition 'n' debacle.

"It's very important that there is an effective remedy for the browser market," Von Tetzchner said.

"Now that Microsoft has acknowledged it has been breaking the law by bundling IE into Windows, the Commission must push ahead with an effective remedy," he added.

A ruling by the Commission is expected late this year. Von Tetzchner said it may come sooner, following Microsoft's decision to strip out IE from Windows 7. "Their decision should make room for a faster conclusion," he said.


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