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Sony patents 'Wiimote for PS3'

Motion-sensing technology for the PlayStation?

Rumours that Sony is preparing to take on Nintendo's motion-sensing Wii controller have been revived after the PlayStation 3 (PS3) maker filed a patent for a technology that uses ultrasonic waves to track a player in 3D space.

According to a patent filing, the technology includes a "game interface tracks the position of one or more game controllers in 3-dimensional space using hybrid video capture and ultrasonic tracking system".

"The captured video information is used to identify a horizontal and vertical position for each controller within a capture area," continues the report. "The ultrasonic tracking system analyses sound communications to determine the distances between the game system and each controller and to determine the distances among the controllers."

The controller also fits together in a variety of combinations, much like the Menacer light gun peripheral for the Sega Genesis in the early 1990s. The original break apart PS3 controller design was actually unveiled in a separate patent filing earlier this year.

The Xbox 360, for its part, also saw its share of motion control rumours swirl throughout 2008. As of today, however, Microsoft has continued to deny the existence of a motion controller for that console.

See also:

Sony PS3 review

Nintendo Wii review

For more games news, reviews and free games downloads, see Games Advisor


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