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CES: Samsung e-reader has writing facility

Use touchscreen and stylus to take notes

Samsung has joined the e-reader market with the launch of four devices that feature a touchscreen you can take notes on with a stylus.

The Samsung E6 sports a 6in screen, while the E101 has a 10in screen. The handwriting capability is due to a built-in electromagnetic resonance (EMR) stylus pen with software options on how thick to draw or write on the screen.

The writing capability sets Samsung's e-reader apart from other models on the market but the function comes with a steep price tag.

Samsung has unveiled four models of e-reader

While the most expensive mainstream 6in e-readers cost between $200 (£125) and $250(£155), the Samsung E6 will be priced at $399 (£250). The larger E101 will cost $699 (£436).

Also on display at CES, was a smaller 5in model and a 6in model with a QWERTY keypad for thumb typing.

CES News

Samsung said the 5in device and 6in one with qwerty keypad will both be launched in the US in March or April, months ahead of the E6 and E101 models, which are both due out in July.

However, Samsung did not say when the e-readers would hit the UK. There were no prices available for these models either.

The Samsung E6 has a 6in screen

Samsung also signed on with Google to offer e-books from Google's library of over 1 million volumes.

E-books can be downloaded wirelessly on the device via Wi-Fi 802.11b/g signals or sharing content with other devices with Bluetooth 2.0. The new Samsung e-readers can run for  twoweeks after charging, the company said.

See also: Sales of e-readers to surge in 2010


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