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The 10 best Wi-Fi gadgets

They've got wireless, and you'll love them

We've rounded up what we think are the 10 best Wi-Fi gadgets currently available. Add these devices to your network for a new world of wireless productivity and entertainment.

Wireless projector: Beaming the big image

NEC NP 905 wireless projector
Digital video projectors are great for everything from work presentations to watching movies, but connecting one up can be a hassle. NEC's NP 905 wireless projector replaces the clumsy cables with a reliable Wi-Fi link.

The NP 905 is rated at 3,000 lumens and creates a vibrant 1,024-by-768 image on the screen. Along with a multitude of wired connection possibilities, the projector has a built-in 802.11b/g radio. (The wireless connection requires Windows.) Best of all, the projector has a USB port that works with an off-the-shelf keyboard to make quick work of entering the Wi-Fi codes and passwords.

After loading the needed applications on my PC, I configured the Wi-Fi link and had it all working in 10 minutes. NEC's Image Express program sends whatever is on the screen of my PC to the projector. Unfortunately, there's an annoying control panel at the bottom of the screen, the image is slightly delayed, and occasionally the video stutters, particularly as you get close to its 70ft range.

At £939, the NP 905 costs more than traditional video projectors, but the freedom of motion that it creates is well worth it.

Wi-Fi photo frame: Bottomless pit of snapshots

PF Digital eStarling WPF-388B digital photo frame
If you're like me, you have thousands of digital photos just sitting around on your computer. That's where the £166 eStarling WPF-388B digital photo frame comes in, setting them free so they can be viewed in any room you want via an 802.11b/g Wi-Fi link.

Although the original eStarling frame released in 2006 had some infamous defects, the current model has ironed out the kinks. Built around a black plastic frame with clear edges, the eStarling's 8in LCD seems to float in air as it displays up to 256MB worth of pictures.

The 800x600 resolution is a little skimpy, particularly for 8Mp and 10Mp images, but the device downsizes the images to fit. Downsized images look excellent, with no jaggies, snow or artifacts.

The frame comes with a tiny remote control that lets you adjust the timing of the slide show and choose from six transitions, including a dissolve and various wipes.

After plugging in the frame, I connected it to my PC with the included USB cable so that I didn't have to use the frame's screen and buttons for entering my network's security key. It was all connected in about five minutes. The frame has a range of 100ft from the router, but annoyingly takes a couple of minutes to start displaying the images.

Rather than lifting the photos from your PC, the frame works with PF Digital's SeeFrame online picture service, which provides unlimited free storage. You can email shots one at a time or upload them in groups directly to the site.

The frame also works with nine other online photo services, including Flickr and Picasa, as well as RSS image feeds. All told, it's a great way to get photos out of your PC and into your living space. Sadly its currently only available in the US.

NEXT PAGE: Wi-Fi security camera: Something to watch over me

  1. They've got Wi-Fi and you'll love them
  2. VoIP phone: Wi-Fi calls for less
  3. Wi-Fi SD card and camera: Beam up your snapshots
  4. Wireless projector: Beaming the big image
  5. Wi-Fi security camera: Something to watch over me
  6. Wi-Fi Media Center extender: HDTV everywhere


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