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Standard for connecting gadgets to TVs planned

New industry standard for high-def video links

Several major consumer electronics companies have started working together to develop a common interface for hooking up mobile phones and portable gadgets to TV sets.

The group includes several of the biggest names in electronics, including Sony, Toshiba, Samsung and the world's biggest mobile phone maker, Nokia. Silicon Image, which makes chips for gadgets, is also part of the group.

Recently a number of gadgets, including portable media players, mobile phones and cameras, that support high quality video have been launched but consumers looking to connect them to a living room TV face problems. Many have proprietary interfaces and require the purchase of special cables or a dedicated docking station.

The development work now starting among the five electronics companies will seek to come up with a common interface so that devices from different manufacturers should be able to connect without the need for special gear.

The group will base its work on Silicon Image's Mobile High-Definition Link technology and will support up to 1080P video, the highest quality high-definition video standard in current use.

As part of their plans to promote the system as an industry standard the group will establish a consortium open to other manufacturers to drive development and standardization.

The companies didn't specify launch timing for the technology.


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