London’s Tate gallery was yesterday awarded two Bafta (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) Interactive Entertainment Awards for accessibility and technical innovation.

One prize was awarded to the Tate Modern’s i-Map, the UK’s first online art resource for the visually impaired.

The site, created by web author Daniel Porter and the gallery’s curator Caro Howell, was launched to coincide with the Tate’s Matisse-Picasso exhibition. The site incorporates raised text, image enhancement, deconstruction and animation.

“Anything which makes art and culture more accessible to blind and visually impaired people deserves an award in my book,” said a spokesperson at the Royal National Institute of the Blind.

The second Bafta was awarded to the Tate’s multimedia tour. Another first for the UK, the three-month pilot project used wireless technologies, such as PDAs (personal digital assistants), to deliver material to visitors.

Visitors viewing collections could take advantage of video and still images that provided added content for the works on display, including expert talks and interactive screens for Q&A sessions.

“The Tate is delighted to have won two Bafta awards and, with the help of our sponsors, including BTopenworld, we hope to continue pushing the boundaries,” said Alex Beard, deputy director at the Tate.