We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
79,812 News Articles

Music and book industry will lose billions

Online file sharing about to do serious damage

The music and book publishing industry stands to lose billions in revenue from online file sharing, according to a report released yesterday from Forrester Research. And there’s nothing they can do about it.

Digital rights management (DRM) - technology for encrypting and watermarking files to impede unauthorised transmission - won't work, said Eric Scheirer, Forrester's music industry analyst.

"The basic problem is that DRM is trying to keep honest people honest," he said. "With Napster out there, that's not good enough. It only takes one person to break the encryption, and then the encumbered version is competing with the unencumbered version on Napster."

Consumers have spoken, and they demand access to content by any means necessary, he said. "Neither digital security nor lawsuits will stop Internet theft of content."

Napster's power stands as an indication of what Forrester terms "collapse of control." Napster's controversial free music file-sharing service is among the fastest growing Web sites ever. Record company lawsuits against Napster haven't exactly stigmatised online trading of pirated music. Even if Napster dies in bankruptcy, music consumers will move to underground Internet services like Gnutella and Freenet, Scheirer said.

Forrester estimates record labels will lose £2.16 billion and book publishers £1.07 billion by 2005 because of file sharing.

Business models that depend on content control won't reap sustainable revenues, he said. "Publishers should treat Napster as a competitor, and not presume it's going to go away. They think of themselves as manufacturing companies," he said of publishers, adding, "but that's not the way consumers think about music. They want to be able to access music as a service."

Sites that embrace artistic works as service to be provided and not a commodity to be manufactured will see the profits that traditional publishers lose, as will artists that move towards self-publishing. Musicians will gain £710 million, authors £912 million and third-party service companies £1.99 billion by 2005, Forrester's report said.

However, film companies have less to fear, Scheirer said. "The ways consumers use music are different from the ways people use movies," he said, noting that the pay-per-view and video rental business model serves consumers in the way they want, and it provides a cushion for the movie industry to transition to digital distribution over time.


IDG UK Sites

Nokia Lumia 530 review: £60 smartphone offers decent build and performance, awful screen and...

IDG UK Sites

Apps watch: What the NFL can teach UK sports such as cricket and rugby

IDG UK Sites

VFX Emmy: Game of Thrones work garners gong for Rodeo FX

IDG UK Sites

iPhone 6 release date, rumours, video, UK price & images: Video shows 'new, reversable iPhone 6 cha'......