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Apple users struggle with Mini DisplayPort DVI

Screen artefacts and blank displays reported

Owners of the latest MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air models can connect their laptops to 30in displays using Apple's £68 Mini DisplayPort to Dual Link DVI Adapter. However, some users have been reporting problems with the new adaptor, ranging from screen artefacts to completely blank displays.

Some of those reporting problems are connecting the adapter to third-party displays from Dell and Samsung, and have posted that Apple tech support told them that only Apple's 30in Cinema Display HD was supported by the adaptor.

Mini DisplayPort to DVI AdapterHowever, according to an Apple spokesperson, the adaptors are intended to be used with displays other than Apple's. "Customers can use the Mini DisplayPort to Dual Link DVI Adapter to connect their MacBook, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air to a 30in display that includes a DVI connector," the Apple spokesperson told Macworld US. "This includes third-party 30in displays, and of course, Apple's 30in Cinema Display HD."

Part of the confusion may stem from Apple's own product page for the adaptor. The description at the top reads: “The Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter lets you connect the 30in Apple Cinema Display HD to a MacBook, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air with a Mini DisplayPort,” while the overview further down says that you can connect the adaptor "to a 30in display that includes a DVI connector, such as the 30in Apple Cinema Display HD."


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