Samsung’s tablet range is vast, so choosing one isn’t easy. This eight-inch Galaxy Tab 4 also comes in 7- and 10-inch versions, all of which are available in black or white, and each model is also available as a 4G version, which we have here. Also see: The best tablets of 2014.

Strangely enough, the SIM card isn’t just for data: you can also make phone calls, making this the biggest phablet we’ve ever tested.

The Tab 4 is aimed price-conscious end of the market as opposed to the Tab S, which is Samsung’s flagship tablet.

The design is only subtly different to the previous model – the Tab 3 – now with a centrally mounted rear camera and the same rear-facing speaker. Also, the microUSB port is now on the bottom edge instead of the side.

Below the power and volume buttons are are two pop-out covers: one for the micro SIM card and one for a microSD card. You can use up to 64GB cards. Also see our Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 vs Apple iPad Air comparison review.

We don’t like the two touch-sensitive controls either side of the home button because they don’t light up, which means you can’t find them in the dark. We’re also not too keen on the obviously plastic finish – the Tab 4 looks like a budget tablet.

Despite theThis makes text look fuzzier than on the cheaper LG G Pad 8.3. Some people may not find this an issue, but it’s a disappointment considering the price. It appears to be the same screen used in the Tab 3, with vivid colours and decent viewing angles.  relatively steep price, the screen has a low resolution.

One upgrade over the Tab 3 is a quad-core processor, but it runs slower than the Tab 3’s dual-core chip. It’s fast enough for basic tasks such as email and web browsing as well as running two apps on screen at the same time, but we’d expect better for the money.

Although you’ll be able to play the latest games, graphics quality is likely to be pared back in order to maintain smooth gameplay.

One upgrade over the Tab 3 is a quad-core processor, but it runs slower than the Tab 3’s dual-core chip. It’s fast enough for basic tasks such as email and web browsing as well as running two apps on screen at the same time, but we’d expect better for the money.

Although you’ll be able to play the latest games, graphics quality is likely to be pared back in order to maintain smooth gameplay.

The Tab 4 comes with Android KitKat and Samsung’s usual Touchwiz interface. It’s fairly easy to use, and it’s sometimes handy to be able to run two apps on screen at once. So, you could have a YouTube video playing while you browse the web or check your email and it’s easy to adjust how much space to give each app by dragging the dividing line.

See also: Best Android tablets 2014: here's where we bring to you the 22 best Android tablets in the UK right now.

There are both front and rear cameras, but both are poor quality. The main camera is only three megapixels, and the photos and videos it takes aren’t great. Video is shaky and lacks detail, and photos are ok only if you’re uploading snaps to Facebook.

Even though the Tab 4 8.0 is one of Samsung’s cheapest tablets, it’s no bargain. You’ll save around £45 by opting for the Wi-Fi-only version, but even then, you’re better off with LG’s G Pad 8.3 which has a full-HD screen and a better processor.