The iPad mini 3 is Apple's latest small tablet, but it's hard to spot the differences from last year's iPad mini. Here's our iPad mini 3 video review. (Also see our full iPad mini 3 review)

That's because there aren't many. The most important update is the Touch ID fingerprint sensor, which you can use to unlock the iPad and buy apps and media from Apple’s iTunes shop. Also see: Best tablets 2014

A much more minor change is the introduction of new gold colour. Also see: Apple Advisor

A less popular 'upgrade' may be the removal of the middle-ground 32 gig capacity. We'd rather Apple had dropped the 16 gig capacity and start at 32, since 16 gig really isn’t enough these days, especially as the usable space out of the box is more like 12 gig.

Of course, this is a pessimistic attitude as the 64 gig iPad mini 3 costs the same as the 32 gig version did last year, so you're effectively getting double the storage (and a Touch ID sensor) for the same price.

The iPad mini 3 shares the same design as the two previous generations, but we still love this size which is ideal for most things, whether browsing the web, reading a book or playing games. It's also light enough to do some of those things one-handed.

Another bonus of the iPad mini 3 is that it has a sharper, higher density screen than the iPad Air 2 because it has the same resolution on a smaller screen.

The mini iPad also gets to keep its mute switch, which can also be used to lock screen rotation. For some reason Apple has removed this on the iPad Air 2. Also see: iPad Air 2 vs iPad mini 3 comparison

As the mini 3 has the same processor as the mini 2, performance is identical. Although the iPad Air 2 is even more powerful, there hasn't yet been a moment when we've wished the iPad mini 3 was faster. It's a speedy tablet.

Plus, because it's a 64-bit processor, it should be able to run virtually apps released in the future, making it a future-proof purchase.

As with performance, there's no change in photo and video quality from the iPad mini 2. The update to iOS 8 brings a new Time-lapse video mode and panoramic photos, so apart from slo-mo video which is restricted to the iPad Air 2, the mini 3 has a fairly versatile camera.

Photo quality is decent enough, with great colours and sharp details. Video benefits from the rear-mounted microphone, along with the usual sharp footage we've come to expect from iOS devices.

The iPad mini 3 might be a great tablet, but Apple still sells the mini 2 alongside it. It's £80 cheaper than the equivalent iPad mini 3, which makes the older tablet the better choice for most people who don't need Touch ID.

Storage capacities are limited to 16 or 32 gig, though, so if you need more than that, it could be worth paying the extra for the iPad mini 3.

Read next: iPad mini 3 vs iPad mini 2 comparison