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Griffin Navigate and PowerJolt for iPod

Griffin has unveiled three new iPod and iPhone accessories that will keep your digital audio player or phone fully charged whle on the go.

The PowerJolt Reserve is a 12v USB car charger that plugs into the cigarette lighter but also features a rechargeable backup battery. Griffin says the battery offers a full charge to any iPod or iPhone.

The PowerJolt Reserve costs £24.99 and will be available from May.

This will be joined by the Navigate, a tiny device that allows you to change tracks or playlists on your iPod or iPhone while it's tucked in your pocket. The Navigate features a dock connector, which plugs into the iPod or iPhone and also a 3.5mm jack where your headphones can be connected. The iPod or iPhone can then be tucked out of the way, allowing to skip tracks and change playlists from the palm-sized device. It also includes a FM radio.

The Navigate is priced at £44.99 and will be available from Currys this month.

The company also revealed it had updated its TuneFlex Aux iPod and iPhone car mount and charger. The charger now features the SmartClick device, which can be steering-wheel mounted, allowing you to change tracks safely while driving.

The SmartClick device is connected to the steering wheel mount by a magnet, so that it can be removed from the mount and passed to the passengers in the back o the car, allowing them to control the music being played on your iPod or iPhone.

Griffin's Navigate ensures your iPod or iPhone can be tucked out of sight

 

The Griffin PowerJolt Reserve

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