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2,862 Tutorials

How to use Ubuntu's Maverick Meerkat

What to do when you start your life with Linux

Ubuntu 10.10, which is also known as Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat (reviewed here), is proving to be one of the best, most user-friendly distributions of the Linux operating system ever seen, so it's no wonder that businesses and individuals are adopting the new operating system in growing numbers every day.

Though Ubuntu is now right up there with Mac OS X and Windows in terms of usability, it is still a bit different from those proprietary counterparts. Besides watching out for a few mis-steps common among first-timers, there are a few things newcomers should do to maximise their enjoyment of Ubuntu.

Particularly if you're new to Linux, here are a few things you should do first with your new operating system.

1. Customise the look

Few things will help you make Ubuntu feel like home better than customising the appearance of your desktop, and there are virtually limitless possibilities for doing that. You can try out different themes, backgrounds, and desktop effects, and you can even replace the GNOME interface that currently comes standard with Ubuntu with a different one altogether, such as KDE.

Customisability is one of Linux's key strengths, and you should explore for yourself just how much you can do. In Maverick, start under the 'System' tab and choose 'Preferences' and then 'Appearance'. Here, you'll get options for Themes, Background, Fonts and Visual Effects. Once you've exhausted the possibilities listed there, you can also try visiting the Ubuntu Software Center (below) for more options.

2. Check out the Software Center

One of the biggest things to get used to for veterans from the Windows world, in particular, is that you don't need to hunt around on the Web and then haul out your credit card to get new applications. Rather, there's the Ubuntu Software Center for that, and its power is breathtaking.

The Ubuntu Software Center is what's known as a package manager, and it shows by category a raft of (usually open source) applications that you can download, generally for free. So, when you want to get an application of some sort, you should begin there. Go to 'Applications' on the main Ubuntu page and you'll see it listed at the bottom of the drop-down menu that follows.

Once you're there, you'll see apps categorised into several sections, including Accessories, Education, Games, Graphics, Internet, Office, Sound & Video, Themes & Tweaks, and System. Click on the category you're interested in, and you'll see a variety of choices listed that are available for download. Click on one, and it is yours. Couldn't be much easier.

NEXT PAGE: Explore the community

  1. What to do when you start your life with Linux
  2. Explore the community

See also: Opinion: Who's afraid of the Maverick Meerkat?

See also: Living with Linux: installing and using Ubuntu Netbook Edition

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