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How to delete Registry data infections

Helproom: getting rid of maverick malware

QUESTION I installed the free version of Malwarebytes Antimalware on my brand-new Vista PC. Every time I perform a quick scan it reports two Registry data infections. Super Antispyware Free, meanwhile, tells me the computer is infection-free.

The files in question are 'Hkey.Classes_Root\scrfile\shell\open\command\(default) (Broken.OpenCommand)' and 'Hkey.Classes_Root\regfile\shell\open\command\(default) (Broken.OpenCommand)'.

I've tried removing the files using Malwarebytes and rebooting the PC, but they quickly reappear.
Ken Reid

The Registry keys you've listed are indeed related to strands of malware. And it's not uncommon for such things to be recreated following a system reboot.

To permanently delete the files, first try using a different antimalware program. You'll need to uninstall your current arsenal before trying other apps, however.

Microsoft's free Microsoft Security Essentials suite is a solid choice. Download and install the program, then let it update itself. Following this, run a full system scan to make sure the previous security software you were using didn't miss anything.

Once any infections have been removed, consult your system's startup configuration. Go to Start, Search, type msconfig and press Enter. Click the Startup tab in the System Configuration utility that appears and look for any entries that look out of place there. In particular, check for programs you haven't installed and deselect them. This will stop them starting up when Windows loads.

Reboot Windows and run a full system scan to check your computer is now clean.

It's also worth running CCleaner. This incredibly useful free app can check the nooks and crannies in which malware may be hiding.

Turn off System Restore to remove any old restore points that were created when the malware was on your machine. Be sure to immediately switch System Restore back on again and run through its wizard to create a new restore point.

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