Look at the landscape through your viewfinder - check for anything you don't want in the frame, such as telegraph poles, people and cars. Try to extract them from the shot by moving left, right or using the zoom. If you can't, fear not.

Step 1

Step 1

Alternatively, move your position to incorporate something in the foreground. A friend or a tree can add depth to an otherwise flat shot. It's a good idea to force your flash to shoot (look for the lightning symbol on your menu). This will highlight your foreground element and lift it from the background.

Step 2

Step 2

If there isn't a foreground element, turn off your flash. The effective range is only about 5m and it may ruin your shot. Now pick the ‘sunny' WB (white balance) setting - look for a sun symbol. Some cameras have an ‘overcast' setting, but it's a better option to simply select a bright moment to shoot (above left).

Step 3

Step 3

If the weather is sunny, check whether the light is flooding directly into the camera lens - sun flare may ruin your shot. To avoid this, shade the lens with your hand, change your position (or the angle of your shot) or come back at a different time of day when the sun has moved.

Step 4

Step 4

If you want to capture a fast-moving subject such as flowing water, raise the ISO setting to about 1,600 for a really quick shutter speed. The down side of this technique is that it will reduce the light in your shot. If the picture comes out too dark, try again with a slightly lower ISO.

Step 5

Step 5

If you want to show movement rather than sharp detail, adjust the ISO to a very low setting. This will keep the shutter open longer, blurring any movement - use a tripod or balance your camera on a secure surface to minimise shake. Use the self-timer so you don't have to press the button and wobble the camera.

Step 6

Step 6