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2,862 Tutorials

How to take infrared photographs

Get some attractive, unusual and eerie results

3. To discover how your camera responds to infrared – and what exposure to use – attach the infrared filter and try a test shot in programmed automatic mode. Some cameras will produce good-looking results in this mode. If yours doesn’t, try overexposing more and more until the shot looks right.

Step 3

Step 3

4. Now you’re ready to shoot. If the results of step 3 indicate that you need to overexpose to get good shots, consider a high ISO rating – this will reduce the exposure time but increase image noise. If you want to minimise noise or if your camera requires a long exposure even with a high ISO, use a tripod.

Step 4

Step 4

5. Some cameras produce infrared photographs with a heavy colour cast – normally red or magenta. Even if yours is producing apparently colour-free pics, you need to convert them to proper black-and-white images. Open the image and select ‘Convert to Grayscale (8-bit)’ from the Image menu.

Step 5

Step 5

6. Black-and-white photographs tend to look more attractive if they have high contrast. Select Brightness/Contrast/Intensity from the Adjust menu, then adjust the Contrast slider until you see the effect you want. You might have to adjust Brightness and Intensity too. Click ok when things look right.

Step 6

Step 6

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