We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
 
2,673 Tutorials

How to optimise your graphics card for gaming

Use AMD or nVidia control panel to boost performance

Tweaking the settings on your graphics card can do a lot to improve play during gaming. We've put together some guidelines for obtaining good image quality, as well as for finding the right blend of quality and performance, when tweaking the settings.

Tweaking the graphics settings on your graphics card can do a lot to improve play during gaming.

Whether your PC runs a discrete graphics card in a PCI Express slot or integrated graphics, your video drivers come with a control panel that you can use to make your games look better - if you know what you're doing.

These control panels, unfortunately, are not easy to work with.

Over the years, AMD, nVidia, and Intel have improved the user interfaces - but the underlying technology has also become more complex, and the control panels have gained many more settings to manage.

If your system is powerful enough to run a typical 3D title above 90 or 100 frames per second (fps), then it has excess GPU horsepower that you could use to improve the image quality of the game.

Getting your machine to hit 60fps while pumping up the graphics eye candy will make your overall gaming experience much better.

The hard part is using trial and error - you change a setting, then play the game, then change again - to find the sweet spot, especially since every game and every system is a little different.

My goal here is to give you some general guidelines for obtaining good image quality, as well as for finding the right blend of image quality and performance.

Note that all of the following examples work with Windows 7. They'll likely work with Windows Vista too.

Windows XP users, however, may see differences - and some capabilities (namely, features specific to DirectX 10 and 11) simply aren't available in XP.

Before we dive into the intricacies of in-game settings and graphics control panels, it's worth discussing a few rules of thumb for prioritising which settings to enable.

Start with the in-game control panel

The settings available in the game you're playing are often more optimised than the global settings you can enable with the AMD or nVidia control panel.

As an example, if the game allows you to set anti-aliasing, use that setting rather than the Windows control panel setting. You'll often see better performance in the game, along with improved image quality.

Pump up texture detail and anisotropy first

You may be tempted to start by cranking up the anti-aliasing.

Sure, anti-aliasing removes annoying jaggies (the stair-like lines that replace smooth curves in images), but if you turn it on while the texture detail remains low, you'll end up with a muddy mess.

Low-resolution textures will still look ugly with anti-aliasing turned on.

Anisotropic filtering with modern graphics cards can go as high as 16x with only a modest decrease in performance.

Yet anisotropic filtering makes a huge impact in the look of the game as you move through the world, particularly with objects or textures that recede in the distance as you view them - you'll see less image popping, and long hallways and receding terrain will look smoother and more accurate.

NEXT PAGE: Increase resolution before anti-aliasing

  1. Use your AMD or nVidia graphics card control panel to improve performance when gaming
  2. Increase resolution before anti-aliasing
  3. How to use the in-game controls
  4. nVidia control panels
  5. AMD graphics control panel
  6. Troubleshooting
  7. Game bugs

IDG UK Sites

Samsung Galaxy Note 4 release date, price and specs 2014

IDG UK Sites

iOS 8 features wishlist: the changes iPhone and iPad users want in Apple's iOS 8

IDG UK Sites

25 Years of the World Wide Web: Happy Birthday, Intenet

IDG UK Sites

Developers get access to more Sony camera features