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32 x 64 bit. Think about this....


961

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I've spent a week looking at computers with W7

Most systems for home use have 64 bit W7 installed and, as you have no doubt seen from a trawl through this forum, this can cause difficulty with drivers and software

However, looking at business computers and workstations, it seems that many still use 32 bit

Am I wrong in thinking that 32 bit is still the way to go if you want business type efficiency with worry free operation?

I've eventually ordered a 32 bit business system on the basis that 64 bit is still, perhaps, a step too far

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john bunyan

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Most 32 bit programmes work perfectly well on a 64 bit machine. I now have W 7 64 bit and a few programmes are running in 64 bit (Photoshop CS5 , but the 32 bit version also installs as scanner TWAIN software only runs in 32 bit), also iTunes. Most programme files are in Programme files(x86) folder, where 32 bit programmes are stored.
I chose 64 bit to fully use my 4 Gig RAM.

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961

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A good 10 months have gone by since I last posted on this subject so the following might be useful as an update

This month I needed to replace a suspect hard drive and had reason to use a 64 bit installation of Windows 7 on the new hard drive

The install went without a hitch and whatever drivers were required for the hardware in the computer and without installed automatically without me doing anything at all

I haven't any other software that is 64 bit (so far as I know) but I'm sure that from the RAM point of view with high def movie editing and so on it may now be time to go 64bit

Old scanners and so on may be a problem but most manufacturers now seem to be coming across with products that install faultlessly. They can't really afford to do otherwise I suppose

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ams4127

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I am running Win 7 64 bit since it first came out, as an upgrade from Vista 64 bit.

I have had no trouble at all in finding drivers and the machine is fast and stable with 8GB of RAM installed.

As to whether to go 32 or 64, my answer is the latter, purely because within the next few years there won't be any 32 bit OS available. Think of it as a way of future proofing.

But anyway, you pays your money and takes your pick.

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KremmenUK

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I work for a very large UK IT services company. we are Microsoft partners.

Very soon we will be shifting over to Win 7 from XP Pro and we have been advised to stick to 32bit.

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InCog

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I have followed this thread with interest. Ten months later, I'm wondering if anything has changed. I have just bought Windows 7 to replace the 32 bit Vista on my Dell Dimension and have to decide whether to opt for 32 or 64 bit. I do have 4gbs of ram of which only 3.25gbs are utilised. As far as I can tell, this may be the only advantage and my five year old Epson scanner may not work in 64 bit mode. Has software requiring 64bits made much progress since this thread closed?

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a member

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64 bit has been out for years with XP and more recently Vista , but although Microsoft has been working hard to make it as easy robust and efficient as they can ,its all for nothing until 3rd party software makers write software that not only supports it but is designed specifically for it .yes a lot of 32bit programs are (compatible) wit 64bit but to get the best from such a system it should be all 64bit OS and 3rd party software .then and only then will it truly be 64bit .
Microsoft have hinted on several occasions that the next version of windows (lets call it windows 8) May well be 64 bit only ,I dont know if this has had the desired effect or not but recently there has been a huge amount of activity in the 64bit market ,more software makers are coming forward with 64bit creations and the dealers seem to be jumping on this wagon too ,as the vast majority of new PCs sold appear to be 64bit as standared ,
we are still some way off ,but I reckon that withing 1-2 years ,32bit will be all but gone .
I have several OSs on the same machine in both 32 and 64bit . so I can use my favorite old softwares ,and get to know 64bit at the same time . its coming .....and its picking up speed ,so be prepared .

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Crossbow7

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"I'm just still puzzled as to why consumer machines are all 64 bit even allowing for F.E's explanation."

I think the reason for this is that most consumer machines come pre-installed with 4Gb RAM, & they are fed-up with having to explain to numerous customers why their 32-bit systems don't recognise the entire 4Gb ;-). I wouldn't be surprised if some see this as a good-enough reason for returning their PC for a refund!

As has already been mentioned, the majority of users will be better off with a 32-bit OS. A 64-bit OS is really mostly for those users who need it for a specific/critical computing reason, including the enthusiasts & tinkerers amongst us. G

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961

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I started this thread at the end of October when I was needing to buy a new laptop for my daughter at college as well as considering buying (building?) a new desktop for myself

In the two months that have followed, it may help others to have my view on what I have bought

First, Windows 7 is the easiest and most robust operating system I've come across. And I've been through 3.1 , Me, XP (but not Vista!!)

Windows 7 floats my boat, and no one has got me to say that!

Secondly, while I know 64 bit will be the code of the future, I just cannot see why I need to go there just yet. When I buy 32 bit systems and stuff, it just works. From what others say 64 bit is still an experimental zone, demanding all sorts of "authorisations" etc

I've bought a Dell business vostro W7 32 bit and an Acer laptop W7 in the last 2 months. Both are 32 bit, both work, out of the box without a hitch. I'm highly delighted with both and neither are "Mr Slow"

I'm just still puzzled as to why consumer machines are all 64 bit even allowing for F.E's explanation

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Aushvill

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as a matter of fact

32bit Operating System cannot exceed system memory(RAM)beyond 4 GB

hence all the triple channel mode supported by the Core i7's will not be fully utilised (unless ofcourse u r using a 1GB x 3 config)

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a member

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nope ,but more can be done via multitasking etc, hard drives are the weak point and have been for some time ,have run dual hyperdrive (ramdrives) raided (0)that makes a huge difference everything happens just about instantly even working huge files in photoshop is so fast its scary ,but at a huge cost as RAM is going up in price again .
look up hyperdrive 5 if your interested ,but it works out darn expensive . even the best (fastest) hard drives around wont keep up with a couple of hyperdrives raided.
SSDs are getting more reliable and maybe in the next year or two will become cheap enough to most users .but whatever the storage methods used ,any speed problems wont be with RAM or processor ability .
more RAM will only be beneficial if you work a lot with large files and RAM hungry programs DVD editing etc , graphic hungry games.
for most everyday tasks ,4gb is more than enough ,and that should cope with several tasks at the same time with out problems .
I do a fair bit of PC biulding and allways have lots of RAM lying about ,I can allways use it up in biulding PCs ,I would never normally use anything over 8 gb ,its overkill .
the 16gb ddr3 system I spoke of was just experamental and has 8 OSs installed , as a test bed for various softwares .

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