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1080P TV picture quality worse than HD ready TV's


mrwoowoo

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I have three LCD HD ready tv's.
My 1080p TV picture quality is worse than my two HD ready ones.
Is this because they are all set up through an aerial and Freeview?
I assume the 1080p TV requires an HD image to get the best result. I can only guess that a Freeview image is produced at 1366 x 768 resolution which results in the 1920 x 1080 image of my full HD TV having to stretch it to fit the screen which results in a lack of clarity.
Also my mate has the same make/model TV but it's the 1366 x 768 version and his picture knocks mine for six. His is set up through a satalite dish with Sky.
Do i need a dish to see an improvement? or is the TV a duff one?

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BT

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..but you should still get a good picture regardless of the input.

I have a 32" Finlux 1080p HD ready TV.

It has its own Freeview tuner and I also have a Sony PVR/DVD recorder with Freeview which is connected via HDMI and a Virgin cable box connected via SCART. The picture quality from all of these is excellent. The worst picture is the straight analogue connection from the aerial.
None of these is HD although the PVR has 1080p upscaling for DVD playback.

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morddwyd

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"I assume the 1080p TV requires an HD image to get the best result."

They all require an HD image to get an HD picture, either through a Sky HD box, or a Freesat HD box/tuner or a Freeview HD box/tuner.

If yo don't have some form of HD tuner, and integral ones are not yet all that common, you won't get an HD picture.

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mrwoowoo

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It makes no difference whichever aerial socket i use. It still has the worse picture.

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BRYNIT

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It could be the TV depending on Make/Model.
It could be the signal quality if you have 3 TV's of 1 aerial.
It could be a fault with the aerial cable or the connections at the end.
You will need to eliminate these possible problems before saying that the TV is faulty.

As a suggestion I would move the TV next to one with a better picture quality. Use this aerial cable to see if you are now getting a better picture. If the picture improves this will indicate that the original aerial cable needs checking.

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Rayuk

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Have you got it set up for 720 or 1080

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mrwoowoo

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Thanks for all your answers.
Will tick resolved.

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dms_05

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Freeview is a very low definition picture and the higher the resolution of the TV screen the worse it will look. Freeview is broadcast at 720*576 screen resolution. So on a 1920*1080 screen you are using approx 1/5th of the screens ability.

Sky broadcast HD at 1920*1080i. The BBC/ITV HD is at something like 1366*800.

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natdoor

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Freeview is Standard Definition TV, which is 480 lines. All of your TVs will have some form of upscaling to produce a format compatible with the screen resolution. The effectiveness of this appears to vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and the required upscaling to 780 is less than required for 1080 and yields better results in general.

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