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Freeview and Freesat


LastChip

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I've spend the best part of all afternoon looking for an unequivocal answer to the following question.

If you have a TV with a built in Freeview digital tuner, will that TV receive Freesat signals and decode them?

I understand Freeview is terrestrial and Freesat is satellite, but are the signals the same? After all, they're both digital!

There are dozens of web sites that compare the various advantages of each, but none that I've found answer that basic question.

They either assume you don't have digital (at present I don't) and therefore need a dish, decoder and TV, or you already have Sky and want to convert.

So, is there anyone who can answer this question with a categoric, "yes it can" or "no it can't" please?

If it's any help, the manual says, "Antenna 75 ohms Coaxial cable (Analog/DVB-T). I rather suspect the answer from that is going to be, no.

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BRYNIT

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No a freeview tuner will not decode a freesat signal.

Freeview gets its signal from an aerial and freesat requires a Dish.

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LastChip

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Yes, I do understand that, but what is the difference in the signals? The point I'm making is, they are both digital, so is it the decoding process that is different or something else?

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wiz-king

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The tuners work on different frequancies. The digital bit is the same. The digital encoding is usually MPEG4/MPEG2.
To answer your question of can it /cant it
NO you cant view freesat.

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LastChip

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That's exactly what I was trying to find out. It wasn't that BRYNIT's answer was wrong, I simply couldn't understand why.

So my understanding now is, if I want to use Freesat, even though my TV is Freeview capable, I will still need an external decoder for the system to work.

I hope at last, I've got it right!

Thanks to you both.

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john bunyan

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Yes and its even more complicated. Some TV's have built in (HD ready) Freesat, and others the equivalent HD ready Freeview. I think some even have both. If you want Freesat on a Freeviw TV you need a decoder such as the Humax Foxsat.(and a dish)

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amonra

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I have got an aerial connected to my TV to receive Freeview. I also have a satellite dish connected to a Bush satellite receiver connected via a scart lead to the TV. There doesn't appear to be any sigificant difference in quality of the pictures on either system. The only advantage of sat. over aerial is the ability to receive english regional versions of BBC programs rather than the Welsh ones I receive via the aerial.

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john bunyan

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Interesting. I think Freesat is good for people who can't get a good Freeview signal, and for those who want HD Freesat until the Freeview version of HD is available in their area.

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LastChip

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Just to clarify a little, we come under the London area, though right on the fringe and Channel 5 reception has been nothing short of appalling, to the point on many occasions, it is not watch-able. We are known to be in a weak signal area. And yes, I've tried aerial amplifiers and high gain aerials, but it makes little difference.

As I'm sure you will all know, London is the last region to switch to digital and I was pondering whether to go the satellite route, as just maybe (almost certainly), I would get a much better reception.

The site where the dish would go has clear line of site to the satellite, with no large trees and suchlike in the way. From what I've been reading, the only "interference" I may suffer, is due to certain weather conditions - rain in particular.

The great unknown for me, is whether when the area finally switches to digital, the terrestrial signal will be better and in a sense, I'm reluctant to wait to find out (that maybe) it's not and then it becomes a mad rush to get a dish and install it.

I was however hoping, not to have yet another box to be able to receive the signal. Sadly, that has (with all your help) proven not to be the case.

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john bunyan

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Worth looking at this type of thing:

click here

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