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Jessops order, company under administration. Credit card refund?


simonjary

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Advice on claiming for refunds on unfulfilled orders from Jessops, if purchased using a credit card.

It's a sad day for Jessops employees as the company (founded in 1935) went bust today.

I was one of those people caught out by Jessops going into administration, as I was awaiting an online order – for a Canon printer, costing £169 - of which Jessops had taken full payment.

Despite some encouraging noises earlier in the week Jessops informed me today by email that it wouldn't be sending out any orders and that no refunds would be forthcoming as the company is now bust.

I will call my VISA card supplier tomorrow in the hopoe of making a credit card claim under Section 75 - whereby the credit card company is legally obliged to refund the card bearer in cases such as these.

Section 75 is summed up by Money Saving Expert as "Pay for something costing between £100 and £30,000 on a credit card and the card issuer's equally liable if something goes wrong."

This includes if a company, like Jessops, goes bust - so I'll report back on how this goes.

More advice: How to claim a refund through a credit card company

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Forum Editor

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It's worth pointing out that Section 75 of the Consumer credit act does not, in itself, provide grounds for a claim against a supplier. You must also have a valid claim of breach of contract or misrepresentation under other law, such as the Sale of Goods Act or the Misrepresentation Act. If you do, then you have a like claim against the card provider for the full amount of the purchase.

In your case it's straightforward - Jessops charged your card account, but have failed to supply the goods, that makes your claim against them one of breach of contract, so you have a like claim against your card provider.

Your claim will therefore succeed.

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simonjary

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I called my credit card provider today, and they registered the claim over the phone.

I now have to wait 45 days for the claim in case it is disputed.

I'll report back then.

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spuds

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Would also point out that vouchers are not being honoured, and extended warranty insurance might have problems unless purchased as a package deal, via finance or credit card.

Would also mention that having used Section 75 three times, some finance providers might try to deny responsibility. Pursue the claim straight away, and you might get there easier!.

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Forum Editor

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If you have a problem with a section 75 claim it can be worth contacting The Financial Ombudsman . Lots of section 75 claims are unfairly rejected by card companies (in fact there has been an increase in the number of rejections) and many of these claims are subsequently upheld by the Ombudsman.

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namtas

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I would also mention that those who paid by debit card may also be able to usew Chargeback

This scheme is an agreement between card issuers to return your money should something go wrong with your debit or credit card transaction.

This scheme can be used to get your money back if an order you make fails to arrive, the company you buy from goes bust, or if goods or services you receive are not as described or are in an unsatisfactory condition. But it can only be called upon if the retailer can’t or won’t help.

The main difference is that Chargeback is a voluntary scheme based on rules set by specific card issuers it is not backed by law

Importantly it isn’t enforced by law in the same way as Section 75 protection for credit cards.

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morddwyd

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Just a word of caution.

You'll probably find that the Financial Ombudsman will be reluctant to get involved unless you can show pretty conclusively that you have fully exploited the relevant company's formal complaint procedures.

This proof normally takes the form of a final letter from the company advising you how to contact the Ombudsman, and enclosing a leaflet.

Failing this a good wodge of Recorded/Special delivery receipts from the post office, or some mp3 recordings of telephone calls.

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