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Statesman Electrical Appliances


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First time I have asked a question which is not directly related to computers but figured this would be an excellent forum to pick brains.

I am looking for a new washing machine. I prefer hot and cold fill washing machines but they are like hens teeth. I have found a manufacturer of a washing machine called Statesman XT6 1230W. My problem is that after six hours trawling the internet I can only find one (not very good) review of the company "Statesman".

Statesman web site shows the coming from Gloucestershire..

My question is has anyone reading this any experience of the company? Do you have a Statesman appliance, either washer, oven, hob, fridge etc.

I would be able to purchase a washing machine via a Euronics store but before I do I really would like more information about the reliability of the company and its appliances.

So - have you any experience of the company Statesman?

Thank you.

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wiz-king

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Statesman's home page.

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Forum Editor

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"A few moans about cold water fills not cleaning the clothes properly and others that think it is just a way of manufacturers to cut down the costs."

Cold-fill machines are certainly cheaper to manufacture, but that's not the reason they have become the standard.

They save energy because a hot and cold fill washing machine uses far more hot water than the machine actually needs. It's much more economical to just draw in cold water and heat only the amount required for the cycle selected. Cold fill machines also increase washing efficiency when using biological detergents and washing at 40 degrees. This is because the enzymes in the detergent work at their optimum level at low temperatures.

So, you save energy and get a more efficient wash - what's not to like?

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frybluff

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Virtually all machines, in this country, are cold fill only. It is supposed to be easier for machines to control, particularly for low temp washes. The "hot" water, in a hot fill, could be at vitually any temperature, from near cold, to near boiling.

Hot fill is possibly more efficient for high (60 deg +) temp washes, but COULD damage delicates, so, overall, cold only is possibly better.

H & C fill machines are still common in some countries on the continent, so are, presumably, still made, for those markets. Whether manufacturers will still sell them, to the UK, is another matter.

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namtas

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I am sorry to disagree that cold water washing machines will be the most efficient for all.

I can not believed that a hot fill machine can possibly use "far" more water than they need, washing machines have a water temperature control thermostat which controls the amount of hot water required to meet the user pre set temperature.

I also cannot believe that the user will save energy by using the machines electric power when the user has a tank of hot water which has been heated by less costly (per kilowatt) gas source

"Cold fill machines also increase washing efficiency when using biological detergents and washing at 40 degrees. This is because the enzymes in the detergent work at their optimum level at low temperatures"

Appliances Online give out this same reason as a benefit for cold water only machines, which of course is a non logical argument as hot and cold fill machines all have user selected temperature temperature setting and the user sets what ever temp they require. In fact the recommendation now from many guides is to wash at a reduced temperature of 30 deg.

I would like to see an independent survey on this as I suspect that consumers have lost a choice that for some may not be the most efficient use of energy, and one that it all down to cost of manufacture, cold water machines have less parts and therefore cost less to produce.

The below business have more information and make interesting reading on the subject see what they say about the W288eco Washing Machine

ISE Limited Unit 5/6 Bonnyton Industrial Estate Munro Place Kilmarnock KA1 2NP

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spuds

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'Which' have a short video regarding their researches on washing machines, and according to the video, it would appear that great discoveries on various brands and methods have come to light via their researches. Not all the top brands, are always the best?.

Off subject, but perhaps worth a mention. A year or more ago, we found that some of our washed clothes were showing minor signs of 'white splashes'. Contacting both the washing machine and the washing powder manufacturer's on the problem. We found that both recommended that washing machines should have a regular 'Maintenance Wash'. This is usually done, with the highest temperature, using a clean water wash, with no detergent or clothes present.

Noticing that this was never mentioned in any instruction books that I have read, both manufacture's agreed, that this method was not well published. But it was an essential thing to do. There are products available for cleaning the water side of washing machines, and one particular brand Power Force Washing Machine Cleaner from Aldi, seems to tick some of the boxes?.

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Woolwell

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The maintenance wash is certainly mentioned in the manual that came with my AEG cold fill. It states "regular" whatever that may mean and that powder (not tablets, etc) should be used.

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Woolwell

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This site has what seem to be good guidance Things you should know about washing machines

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namtas

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Recently we changed from liquid to powder in our washing machine, shortly afterwards subsequent washes began to produce small rust colored specks on the washing these were more annoying as they could be flicked off when dry. However research led us to believe that the change had caused a reaction and loosening of unwanted contamination in the powder tray and feed pipe to the drum. Further research showed that deep cleaning of washing machines whilst not advertised should be a maintenance item, although it was not something that I found in any of the machine literature. Many weird and wonderful home remedy's were advertised but suffice to say we went with a propriety product which has solved the problem. We now operate a regular cleaning program.

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spuds

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Regarding the detergent, when I had the chat with the washing machine and the powder manufacturer's, both advised that we change from powder to liquid. The powder manufacturer even sent us a special dispenser and voucher for two large containers of liquid detergent, from the range they produced.

We have since returned back to powder form, and no further 'white splashes' have been noticed. Whether the liquid detergent as a machine cleaning agent, I haven't bothered to find out.

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Forum Editor

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namtas

The point you've missed in your post is that machines which use stored hot water are taking water that may have previously been heated (by gas) several times.

In a conventional boiler/domestic hot water situation the water in the storage cylinder is maintained at the temperature set by the householder, using a cylinder stat. This temperature will commonly be set to keep the water at between 60 and 65 degrees, and to do that the stat cycles the boiler on and off, constantly maintaining the water temperature.

Enter the hot-fill washing machine, set to operate on a 40 degree washing cycle. It has to use cold water to mix the incoming hot water down from say 60 degrees to 40 - you've wasted money heating up water that has to be subsequently cooled down; money is literally going down the drain.

A cold fill machine heats cold water once only, to exactly the required setting and no more. Tests have demonstrated that energy savings are made, which is one reason the machines are manufactured to heat water this way. Some manufacturers have claimed a 40% energy saving over a hot and cold fill machine. I don't know about that, but I have seen figures that support a claim for a substantial saving in energy costs over a year of average use.

It's not rocket science.

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