We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Tech Consumer Advice


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Wireless Room Thermostats


spuds
Resolved

Likes # 0

Apologies for not being computer related, but have you any experiences with Wireless Room Thermostats?.

I have had a look at a number of reviews, but still cannot form an opinion if these devices are 'worthwhile', in perhaps resolving temperature issues in various locations of a property, without the need of wiring?.

One particular model that is on my watch list: Salus Digital Room Thermostat RT500RF http://www.salus-tech.com

Any help or advice on the above questions would be welcomed and appreciated.

Like this post
blodgett

Likes # 0

Try this system - Not cheap, but very efficient or alternatively use itemp terrier programmable radiator valves.

Like this post
blodgett

Likes # 0

Oop's sory forgot link http://www.housetechsolutions.co.uk/

Like this post
frybluff

Likes # 0

BLODGETT

These types of system can certainly save on running costs, particularly where different rooms are predominantly used at different times of the day. They do, however have a couple of drawbacks, which one should consider. Unless one specifies to the contrary, radiators in each room will be sized to maintain a particular temperature, against loses to EXTERNAL, in cold weather. A margin is then added to boiler sizing to give prompt heat up. If one, then, controls individual rooms on a TIME and temperature basis, there will be heat losses from one room, TO ANOTHER, with which the radiators may struggle to cope, particularly in very cold weather. In milder conditions, they will probably cope, OK. Modern boilers, and systems, can usually cope well with this type of control; older boilers, and systems, tend to be less FLEXIBLE. One should check, with an independant GasSafe engineer, not some salesman, that one's system is suitable!

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

chub_tor

What you have and how you use it is in line to what I want and was thinking about, to resolve the issues that I have. Thanks for confirming that.

woolwell

The units that I have looked at, only requires the 'receiver' unit fixing, and that is a direct replacement for the existing fixed room thermostat. The 'temperature transmitter' unit can either be 'hooked-on' fixed or free standing to suit any location chosen and wireless range. The Salus unit that I am considering, also as programming in the 'receiver' unit, so as to set manual time/date etc settings over 7 days, if required. The 'transmitter' is basically an on/off temperature sensor, battery controlled, with low battery power indicator.

Thanks everyone who as offered help and advice, very much appreciated. I will now tick this as resolved.

Like this post  
chub_tor

Likes # 0

spuds good, but I did get the transmitter and receiver the wrong way round. The transmitter of course is the sensor part which is in the room and is battery operated while the receiver is the bit that in my case is attached to the boiler and plugged into the mains control box.

Purely for information we bought our system from these guys as we wanted mains pressure hot water without having a pressurised tank and a combi-boiler was not man enough for the job at the time. Maybe they make them bigger now. Our Heat Bank came fully fitted with all controls, including the wireless thermostat so all the plumber had to do was install the boiler, connect the heat bank to the boiler and plug both into the mains power and water supply.

Like this post
frybluff

Likes # 0

As I mentioned, many boiler manufacturers now offer contol packages, specifically suited to their boilers. Some are quite sophisticated, and well worth considering, although, obviously, easier when fitting a new boiler. One word of caution on programmable stats: they are not necessarily a "straight swap" for a conventional stat, if one has a PROGRAMMER for heating and hot water.

Like this post
Terry Brown

Likes # 0

Maybe I have the wrong end of the stick, but surly Wireless means you can move the thermostat wherever you want within reasonable distance of the sender unit, so if it is in the 'wrong place' just move it!..

Terry

Like this post
frybluff

Likes # 0

Yes. One of the main advantages is that with a conventional stat, one has to decide its location in advance, but with a wireless sensor, one can try several different locations to see which is best. In general, however, one should avoid locations where there are thermostatic radiator valves, as the two forms of control can "fight each other". The base unit is, normally, a straight replacement for the room stat, assuming it was wired correctly, in the first place (I wouldn't, necessarily just ASSUME). However, to fully use it for PROGRAMMABLE temperature control, one needs to override whatever is currently contolling the heating times. If heating was controlled by a simple time switch, it should be straightforward. If, however, one has a PROGRAMMER for heating AND hot water, it MAY be less straightforward. Either way, the work should be done by a GasSafe engineer, no matter how simple it may appear to be.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

chub_tor

"The sender unit is mains wired and the remote unit uses a single lithium cell that has yet to be replaced."

It's actually the other way around. The sender unit is the remote, Lithium cell powered part. It simply calls for heat and and sends an 'off' signal. The mains wired device at the boiler is the receiver - it's the one that switches the boiler's heating cycle on and off. The receiver unit is often connected to the boiler's wiring block via a 2-core (eBus) bus cable, but as already mentioned, this is something that should be done by a qualified person.

Like this post
chub_tor

Likes # 0

Forum Editor, yes I did correct that in my second post to spuds at 12.59pm today, but thanks for spotting it anyway.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Best Christmas 2014 UK tech deals, Boxing Day 2014 UK tech deals & January sales 2015 UK tech...

IDG UK Sites

Chromebooks: ready for the prime time (but not for everybody)

IDG UK Sites

Hands-on with Sony's latest smartglasses

IDG UK Sites

Apple TV expert tips: get US Apple TV content, watch Google Play, use multiple Apple IDs and more