We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Tech Consumer Advice


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Central Heater Boiler replacement


Terry Brown
Resolved

Likes # 0

My boiler is now 17 years old and while it is doing well, it will not last forever so I am looking for a new boiler.

If you had had a combi boiler fitted recently (last 2 years) could you give me the name & model of the boiler and satisfaction level from 1(poor) to 10 (Very Good)

Noise , efficienty , gas usuge (compare to previous boiler), servicing required and number of radiators (mine is 7)

Thank you

Terry

Like this post
Terry Brown

Likes # 0

Thanks for the info , and yes it is a corrision inhititor, with a recommendation to be 'power flushed' and replaced every three years.

There is 2 options on the guarrantee:

A standard guarrantee (7 years) parts and labour (boiler only) and I pay for an annual service of £67 per year and £300 every three years for a full power flush and refill, or I can pay £13.70 per month for a 10 year guarrantee which includes the servicing cost, power flushes and all radiators (replacement) and associated pipework. What do you think ?.

Terry

Like this post
buteman

Likes # 0

£534.30 for 3 years with the monthly payments.

Or £501 for 3 years paying yearly.

I would assume the pay monthly deal would be the best deal by far.

The only problem I can see is can you stop the monthly payments at any time or do you have to pay it for the whole 10 years.That would be no good if the boiler only lasted 7 years.

That was counting it as 13 monthly payments of 4 weeks and not a calender month.

Like this post
buteman

Likes # 0

Terry Brown

Sorry about adding on to your post, As it was ticked I thought that it was resolved.maybe I should have read through it first.

Like this post
Terry Brown

Likes # 0

strong textButeman

Yes I did tick it as resolved, then I was offered more advice (many thanks), and I did not realise that there are so many different options (like computers really) and to the layman it is difficult to know the best options, hence the request for advice, which is always welcome.

Terry

Like this post
buteman

Likes # 0

Terry Brown

I must admit it is a bit of a minefield out there as there are so many to choose from.

In a case like this recommendations must be the safest course to follow.

I like the one that the FE put forward and the 5 year warranty helps.

Probably a bit on the high price for my Daughter if she ever gets round to it.

Good luck with whatever you choose.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

romanby1

"If you want peace of mind use a corrosion inhibitor but generally in a domestic installation it is not really necessary."

Yes, it is. Domestic radiators will corrode just as readily as any others.

Saying that a corrosion inhibitor "is not really necessary" is misleading and incorrect. If it wasn't necessary it wouldn't form part of the UK building regulations.

Part L of the regulations state that where gas-fired water-filled heating installations are concerned:-

"*During final filling of the system, a chemical water treatment inhibitor meeting the manufacturer’s specification or other appropriate standard should be added to the primary circuit to control corrosion and the formation of scale and sludge*"

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

"What do you think?"

Whether or not you decide to pay for some kind of maintenance programme is very much a personal thing - some people like the peace of mind that goes with knowing you will not have to pay for expensive parts and labour charges, should your boiler go wrong.

On the other hand...

Modern combi boilers are very reliable, and when they do go wrong it's almost always a case of a quick replacement of the faulty component. Combi boilers are a little like computers in this respect - they're largely assembled from a collection of easily-replaced parts. You are very unlikely to be faced with an expensive repair in the first five or six years of your boiler's life, and anything that happens in the first couple of years will be covered by the manufacturer's warranty anyway.

You might decide to indemnify yourself; set aside a sum of money each month, so that if/when the time comes you'll be able to pay for the repair from your own funds.

Whatever you decide, make sure that corrosion inhibitor is added when the boiler is installed, and make sure that it is replaced regularly. I said earlier that in an ideal world this would be done annually, but in practice every two years would be fine. It takes a very short time to drain down and dose a domestic system - I do mine in about an hour.

Like this post
namtas

Likes # 0

If there are no leaks at all on the system, and you are sure about this you can safely have the strength of the inhibitors checked annually. However if for any reason the system is drained, it will be necessary to re-treat the complete system. Overdosing is not detrimental, it is good practice to add a new bottle of System Inhibitor every one to three years. But do not mix different types of inhibitor.

Corrosion and the consequent sludge occur when oxygen is made available within the system as occurs whenever fresh water is added. Left alone over time in a fully sealed system with no fresh water being added the total dissolved oxygen should become fully depleted.

It is a piece of mind thing but remember every time you add fresh water to your system you are adding a a problem which must to be treated

Like this post
TopCat®

Likes # 0

Just after I moved to my present home in 2002 I had gas brought to the premises and out went the all-night storage heaters. Then a condensing boiler system was installed with the boiler situated in the adjoining garage. A local, fully registered plumber and his then apprentice carried out the work to our satisfaction, at a very reasonable price. He also currently carries out all our annual boiler system checks.

The Baxi boiler has failed to fire up just once since its installation and unfortunately the warranty has expired at the time. Looking in the fault-finding section of the Baxi handbook I deduced that there were two possibles that matched the symptons of the malfunction. Either a faulty gas valve or a system circuit board component failure.

My installer agreed with me but couldn't say which he thought was the culprit, both of which were quite expensive to replace. Having spoken to his supplier, he also added that if either were to be removed from their packaging then they could not be returned for a refund. Sounds familiar? It was left up to me to decide what to order so I plumped for the then £80 electronics board. Thankfully I made the right choice!

I was now left with a faulty circuit board and a reluctance to throw it away. Searching for a suitable repairer I came across QER Ltd at here who gave me excellent service at a very reasonable price, including shipping. I now have the repaired and certified original board at hand, just in case. Fortunately my nine-year-old system is currently 'firing on all cylinders' with a clean bill of health after its recent annual service check.

I thought this experience might possibly be of use to others in a similar predicament. TC.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

TopCat®

An interesting post TC, and a reminder that these circuit boards can often be repaired when they develop faults.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Android One vs Android Silver vs Google Nexus: What is the difference?

IDG UK Sites

Apple updates MacBook Pro line-up: Price cuts & spec boosts for 6 MacBook Pro models

IDG UK Sites

Long live the internet fridge: the Internet of Things is coming

IDG UK Sites

How Prometheus' colourist Juan Ignacio Cabrera gave a tense, edgy feel to Chosen