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Credit Card details


Pine Man
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During the last week I went to a very well known London restaurant three times. Each time I used a credit card and the last time I went the hand held machine ran out of paper just after it had printed the 'Merchants' copy and before it could print the customers copy. I was given the Merchants copy and told they would print themselves another copy for their records. No problem so far.

When I got home I noticed that both of the first two customer copies of CC bills from that restaurant had just the last four numbers of my CC on it BUT the Merchants copy had the full number. Given that the receipt always has the expiry date on it all that is necessary is for the waiter to appear to drop your card and then spot the security number on the back as he picks it up and he is well away!

Why on earth should the merchant need your full CC number on printed paper when the whole transaction is authorised and actioned electronically?

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Pine Man

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Thanks for posting the response from Visa. At least they have had the courtesy of responding unlike my Card Company.

I must confess that I am not entirely convinced by their argument and phrases such as 'Fraud being committed in the manner your reader suggests is very rare, however in the unlikely event of it occurring, cardholders should not be held liable for any fraudulent purchases' certainly do not instil any feelings of confidence whatsoever!

Thanks once again for your help and, if my company ever bother to reply I'll post their 'words of wisdom'.

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Forum Editor

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You're welcome.

I suppose that if VISA says that fraud of this nature is very rare it must be so - they should know, after all.

They're also right about you not being liable for fraudulent purchases - that's the case, no matter what method is used, as long as you didn't do anything to facilitate the fraud. You didn't do anything to jeopardise your card details in this case, and if you hadn't seen the merchant's copy of the transaction slip you wouldn't even have known that your full card number appeared on it.

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Pine Man

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I suppose that if VISA says that fraud of this nature is very rare it must be so - they should know, after all.

You could be right but, being somewhat cynical, unlawfully obtained credit card details are sold for large sums of money before being fraudulently used. A couple of years ago my card details were used to obtain about £10,000 worth of kitchen equipment and other stuff. Nobody ever found out how, or from where, the details had been obtained BUT it would be so easy for an unscrupulous waiter to have obtained this information and sold it on and, despite what Visa say, how on earth could they have known whether it was from merchant copies of transactions or other means?

I didn't lose out directly from the unlawful use of my card details and the credit card company certainly didn't. It is all of us, purchasers and retailers,who are paying for it.

Phew! I feel better for that - for the time being anyway.

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the hick

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On a general point, and as one who has just been victim of 'on-line' fraud, it seems very odd that the so-called 3-digit 'security number' is on the card at all. It would be better, sent seperately in the post, as PIN's are. It is this number, which is often used in purchases by phone, and not the PIN, and yet it is on the card, visible to many waiters, shop assistants, etc.

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