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What's your definition of a beggar ?


Dragon_Heart

Likes # 0

Homeless ?

Hungry ?

Without a job ?

How about this job ............ £50,000 p a and no tax to pay !

The 'right', says The Guardian, is usually keen to champion entrepreneurs, but there's disdain for 'hard-working' London 'beggar; Simon Wright who has just been handed an ASBO to stop him begging anywhere in London.

Wright claimed on his sign asking for money to be homeless, but lived in a "smart" council flat, and spent his money in Now betting shops and amusement arcades, that is clearly misrepresentation ?

BUT ! as a result of the ASBO he will now be claiming benefits.

My first thought was at least he was not spending it on drugs !

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wee eddie

Likes # 0

It's easier to define the negative.

For example: A Street Entertainer while begging, is not in my opinion, a Beggar

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Quickbeam

Likes # 0

wee eddie's example is offering a service.

Dragon_Heart's example is obtaining money under false pretences and gives honest beggars(?) a bad name.

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Forum Editor

Likes # 1

A beggar is someone who asks total strangers for money.

This man was a disgrace, as is the Guardian writer who seeks to justify what he was doing, saying that 'he worked very hard'. I don't call sitting on your backside holding a 'hungry and homeless' sign working very hard.

The writer goes on to say 'he has been stripped of his livelihood, will now be on benefits,and is threatened with prison if he begs again.From being a substantial net contributor to GDP – goodness know what his £50,000 was generating if we take the Keynesian multiplier into account – he has become a drain on the national purse. And we wonder why the public finances are in a mess.'

He has become a drain on the national purse because he's too idle to work for a living. he wasn't a net contributor to GDP - he was simply spending other peoples' money without doing anything to earn it. He was a dishonest,lazy scrounger, and the mess that our public finances are in is due partly to people like him, who think that society is there to provide them with a free ride through life.

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Quickbeam

Likes # 0

I would guess that the FE doesn't part with money to beggars either from that!

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Mr Mistoffelees

Likes # 0

"I would guess that the FE doesn't part with money to beggars either from that!"

Neither do I and the FE is right.

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Chronos the 2nd

Likes # 0

Talking of a drain on the public purse, lets not forget the well heeled beggars in the House of Lords, Telegraph. Who as an unelected body make decisions that affect all our lives yet no matter how much posturing we get from politicians about reform, this body remains as is.

To have this unelected boys club in the 21st century is a joke. But an expensive joke.

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Flak999

Likes # 0

I have to say I agree completely with FE. I have never and would never give money to beggars on our streets. Interestingly today the authorities have taken action to clear a camp of Romanian beggars from the site of the old Hendon FC ground.

For the first time these people have been offered immediate flights home, and I believe sixteen will be on their way to Bucharest today! Romanian beggars on their way home! Shape of things to come next year perhaps?

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kad292

Likes # 0

The Guardian supports scroungers as long as they,the Guardianistas, do not pay.This guy was a regular feature on the streets along with his cohorts,about 8/10 of them,some have returned.

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spuds

Likes # 0

A tricky one this!.

I suppose if you looked hard enough, most towns have their beggar's fitting the same description as this person.

When I worked for the police, I got to know a few, including a rather smartly dressed and well spoken older female, who wanted to phone (mobile phones where in short supply) her son very urgently, but had no change on her. She became very well known about the town?.

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Dragon_Heart

Likes # 0

So the FE does not like The Guardian either !

"He was a dishonest, lazy scrounger, and the mess that our public finances are in is due partly to people like him, who think that society is there to provide them with a free ride through life."

"people like him" who else would you include in that statement FE ? The UK's finances are in one hell of a mess because bankers played multi billion pound games with money that did not exist and they knew full well these games were unsustainable. They affected UK rate payers and non rate payers.

Yes he was dishonest, he claimed he was homeless, but I feel you, possibly due to your prejudice against the paper, have misunderstood The Guardians point.

If people in a wealthy area of London are prepared to part with about £190 a 'working' day then he must be considered a bit of a champion entrepreneur. OK a dishonest champion entrepreneur, but an entrepreneur non the less.

If I spelt the work 'Homeless' without the 'e' could I get away with it ?

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