We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Iain Duncan Smith and his mouth


carver
Resolved

Likes # 0

It seems that Iain Duncan Smith is to be questioned over his misuse of statistics, not content with declaring he could live on £53 a week he then proceeded to falsely claim that 8,000 people had moved into work as a result of the introduction of the benefit cap.

Story here enter link description here.

Now what's that old saying enter link description here

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

The New Statesman piece in the original link begins;

'With deceptively little fanfare'

That says it all really. There was little fanfare because the way politicians use numbers is regularly wrong either through ignorance or a deliberate attempt to manipulate the debate.

These days, anyone with a computer has a pretty good chance of getting to the raw data with a little effort. If a politician says something that sounds surprising take the time to look deeper. If more people did that it would, in time, lead to politicians being more careful about how they use numbers.

When the government announced how many private sector jobs had been created, the figure looked high. A little effort soon showed that it included former public sector jobs that have been outsourced or reclassified. If yesterday you were a civil servant and today your department has become a pseudo-independent agency you are in a newly created private sector job.

Like this post
oresome

Likes # 0

We don't have to do much ourselves.

We have opposition parties to challenge the Government and if they're not up to the job, the likes of Paxman and Humphries probably are.

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

Perhaps being the odd one out, I have always stated, and will continue to do so, that any statistics presented to me "are very suspicious", no matter where those statistics come from, and that includes a politician, one of their researcher's or a newspaper article.

I am also rather surprised as to the Forum Editor's comment?.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

Kevscar1

"and exactly how do you know he just didn't make them up"

I don't, and neither do you, so it's better to make an assumption of innocence until someone proves otherwise.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

spuds

"I am also rather surprised as to the Forum Editor's comment?."

Why is that?

Like this post
userious?

Likes # 0

How do know if a politician is lying?, he's talking.

Like this post  
Kevscar1

Likes # 0

FE In the force we had a sayig If you assume something you make an ass out of u and me so I never do

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

Kevscar1

"so I never do"

Really? I would have thought that you would understand that an assumption of innocence is the bedrock of English law. Our entire judicial system is based on it.

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

"Really?. I would have thought that you would understand that an assumption of innocence is the bedrock of English law. Our entire judicial system is based on it".

On Thursday evening there was a Channel 4 Dispatches television program called "The Hunt For Britain's Sex Gangs". It covered police officer's based from Telford in a long term and very expensive child sex crime and abuse investigation called Operation Chalice, which involved more than 100 victims and around 200 suspected perpetrators. The police suspected and suggested that this figure was very much larger, but a lot of the victim's, including some of the parent's were to scared to make official reports to the authorities.

Most of the children (and that's what they were) who were prepared to come forward where more than often being accused in a very forceful way of lying when attending court. Some of the cases collapsed because the children could not take further stress, in proving they were the victims and not the perpetrator's themselves.

It might be worth watching that program and possible effects of assumption of innocence. When you get fully experienced police officer's suggesting that the law is wrong on certain things and those laws or the actions of the legal profession requires serious reviews and revisions, then there must be something very seriously wrong with English law?.

But what's this got to do with Iain Duncan Smith and his mouth?.

Like this post
Kevscar1

Likes # 0

The wording is presumed innocent until proven guilty pre·sume (pr-zm) v. pre·sumed, pre·sum·ing, pre·sumes v.tr. 1. To take for granted as being true in the absence of proof to the contrary: We presumed she was innocent.

Not assumed as·sumed (-smd) adj. 1. Taken up or used so as to deceive; pretended: an assumed name. 2. Taken for granted; supposed: an assumed increase in population.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Windows 10 launch event as it happened: Read our Windows 10 launch live blog - find out first as...

IDG UK Sites

Windows 9 and the death of the OS as a must-have product

IDG UK Sites

Video trends: 4K is here – HDR video, VR and 3D audio is coming

IDG UK Sites

Best iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus deals: iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus tariffs, contracts and prices UK