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Nursing reforms, good or bad?


michaelw

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Jeremy Hunt plans to get nurses to work for a year as healthcare assistants before taking their degree. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22245588

A good idea or not?

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michaelw

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Personally I think it's a good idea. The reason being that I truly believe the nursing care standards have progressively fallen over the years. When I was young little girls would dream of becoming nurses when they grew up. They even played doctors and nurses games. These little girls were genuinely caring by nature. This has drastically changed. Now nurses' attitudes are that it's just a job and some of the more mundane duties are beneath them. I'm not tarring all nurses with the same brush but there are a hard core of nurses who don't really care about the caring side of their job.

A case in point. How many relatives of ill older people visit them in hospital and find out their loved ones are dehydrated or even worse starving? Well I'll tell you; Forty-three hospital patients starved to death last year and 111 died of thirst while being treated on wards. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9591814/Patients-starve-and-die-of-thirst-on-hospital-wards.html

The heads of The Royal College of Nursing should stop shouting defiantly and hang their heads in shame.

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wee eddie

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There is a problem:

Let The Royal College of Nursing suggest a solution and then we can decide who has the best alternative

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fourm member

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I think most, if not all, universities would say that students who start after a gap year are more mature and more motivated than those who come straight from school.

Now I know we're not talking about hitching round Europe but it seems probable that a year's experience would have the same effect for nursing students.

Personally, I like to see choice wherever possible. I wonder if you could devise a system where students who do a year as a ward assistant make savings on the cost of the final year of their degree.

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spider9

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oresome *" Giving would be nurses an insight of the job before expensive training gives both sides an opportunity of seeing if they are a good match"*

Using your argument about 'experience before expensive training', would this also mean making doctors do the same 'caring training year' before we let them start their lengthy degrees?

They, equally, should surely have good 'caring attitudes' as well.

I'm sure the BMA would love it !!

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carver

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spider9 you could apply the same criteria to most government jobs, say get an MP to live on £75 a week for a year and do community work with the homeless before taking his position up.

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oresome

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spider9

They, equally, should surely have good 'caring attitudes' as well

Is there a suggestion that they don't?

If so it needs addressing and I'll consider my view of the remedial action when it's proposed. Fortunately I have no fear of the BMA. 8>)

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michaelw

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spider9

The reason I think the nursing profession would benefit from health care training before they study a degree in nursing is because I'm not sure the actual training deals with the 'practical' side of things, like very personal care. In this way they'd get their hands dirty, dealing with the elderly perhaps in their homes to able to realise the clients (soon to become patients when they become nurses) aren't just lumps of meat.

I have a relative who has done care work for three years, visiting the vulnerable to care and give personal for them. She loves the job and now wants to train as a nurse.

Incidentally, we had another relative who was dying in hospital for three months and she could provide better care than the nurses.

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Forum Editor

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Six months or so ago I spent eight days in hospital following an accident. I was incredibly bored, just lying there, and - at night particularly - I used to chat to the nurses. It was an eye-opening experience, and for the first time I think I got a real idea of how many of these people feel a genuine sense of vocation - for them nursing is more than a way to earn a living.

One ward sister told me that she felt her years of training and practical experience were being largely wasted now; she felt like nothing more than a form-filling skivvy, drowning in a sea of paperwork. Her main gripe seemed to be that few people entering nursing nowadays were doing it for the 'right' reasons, and that many of them were only here to gain a bit of experience that would stand them in good stead when they left the country to get a better-paid nursing job overseas. She said she found it upsetting to see how little many of these nurses cared for their patients in the old-fashioned nursing sense.

I think Jeremy Hunt's proposal is an excellent one.

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spuds

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Perhaps my memory fails me, but wasn't there a review a year or more ago about qualifications within the nursing profession?.

Some nurses were apparently downgraded and others had to take on extra responsibilities to safeguard their present job.

I know my local hospital trust made some management and administration changes, and in the main, this met with some severe objections. One particular point was how some managers had to take over departments in the mergers, yet these same 'new' managers admitted that their skills were not in the departments that they were expected to run as part of the merger plans.

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Chronos the 2nd

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I think Jeremy Hunt's proposal is an excellent one.

But it should not end at the nurses, doctors consultants should also show hat they are fit for the job.

Up here in Scotland I have discovered that many of the consultants only work part time for their respected NHS Trusts and many of them work primarily for Spire Healthcare, in fact in Edinburgh you are hard pushed to find a consultant that is not part time. Whenever I am referred to a consultant there are two places I use to learn something of them. Specialist info. and my local Spire Hospitals which if the consultant is employed there will have a detailed profile page. This is the guy I am going to see on Monday in regards to my cancer. Spire.

Jeremy Hunt should also be looking at the bureaucracy running our Health trusts. I have been stunned the amount of oddly titled jobs that abound within the bureaucracy all well paid, the amount of long term empty property, the expensive contracts for the supply of even the most basic of items.

The health service is broken and successive government's do little more than apply sticking plasters to massive wounds.

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