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Nursing reforms, good or bad?


michaelw

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Jeremy Hunt plans to get nurses to work for a year as healthcare assistants before taking their degree. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22245588

A good idea or not?

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spuds

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Chronos the 2nd

The shortage of full time professional expertise within the NHS is not solely confined to Edinburgh or Scotland, because it covers the whole of the UK. Most is not all of the consultant's I am involved with are working for the NHS and private hospital's plus possible do their own private consultations mainly as an extra fee earner or insurance company referral.

Even my own GP practise seems to have 'part time' doctor's nowadays, who only work 2 or 4 days per week. The female doctor's seem to run their own families as a full time job, and the doctor's practise as a extra incentive to their main task. Yet when GP's got the substantial increase in pay a few years back, the public were informed that this would make big improvements to the services being provided. Personally I haven't found this, in fact I had to take this issue up recently about how the system allows me to make an appointment, and that wasn't only with the GP practise, but the NHS hospital's as well?.

I don't know if it still applies, but having a consultant working part time in the NHS and in private practise had advantages, especially if you wanted to increase your chances for a quicker NHS consultation and procedure.

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michaelw

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"I don't know if it still applies, but having a consultant working part time in the NHS and in private practise had advantages, especially if you wanted to increase your chances for a quicker NHS consultation and procedure."

We were lucky enough 20+ years ago to be able to afford private medical insurance. Our young daughter had persistent tonsillitis. They had to come out. We saw a doctor, or Mr as the consultants like to be known, at the local hospital. He said it would take about 3 - 6 months on the waiting list. I mentioned our BUPA policy and we got the op done within a few days by the same doctor. Nice if you can get it.

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oresome

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Spuds,

I used to have a dentist who managed a family.

I wanted early morning appointments before going in to work, but she dropped the kids off at school.

So I elected an appointment at the end of the working day, but she was then picking the kids up from school.

I finished up changing dentist.

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fourm member

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Obviously, I would be the last person to claim that my individual experience was shared by everybody but my recent experience has reconfirmed my belief that something is wrong with nursing in at least some parts of the NHS.

My wife had to spend 21 hours in a hospital ward receiving emergency blood transfusions.

(An important aside. If you give blood, thank you very much.)

During that time, no cleaner was present. Food that she dropped at lunchtime was still on the floor when I went to collect her at 8pm. There was a noticeable amount of litter on the floor, much of it related to caring activities (things like the tear off strips that expose the pre-gummed flap of sample envelopes) so nursing staff were responsible for its being there.

Worse, when I took her to the bathroom before leaving, a commode pan full of urine had been left on top of the waste disposal bin in the toilet.

You might argue that it is not the nurses job to pick up litter, even if they drop it, but I would disagree. When I worked at a visitor attraction our induction training included being told that we must pick up any litter we saw and, if we saw any manager from the MD down, walk passed litter we must bring it to their attention.

If that sort of basic attention to detail is part of the training for visitor service staff, I think it should be the foundation of any nursing training.

Though we saw no cleaners, we did see lots of notices about the consequences of bad hygiene. Notices don't stop the spread of norovirus or MRSA.

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spuds

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Over the past few years, I have had quite a bit of involvement with my local hospital trust and their facilities. I have even gone to the top of the chain of management command, or the supposedly Watchdog's when it was required.

In the case that fourm member mentioned, you have to be involved with these situations to actually know what is going on, but again, and I have said this on a number of occasions, do people ever bother to complete the questionaires that are usually available, with the request that they get a response. Or even make there observations known, so as to perhaps safeguard others?.

Virtually every NHS hospital is now maintained and run by private outside contractor's, in one form or another. You cannot blame a cleaner or anyone else, whose daily tasks are on a strict supervised rota system, because the company that employs them, wants it that way for profit.

With regards to MRSA and all the other precautions to combat disease, then its not unknown now, that there are some operations were the patient is provided with substances like 'Stellisept' which a to be used on a daily basis before the operation will go ahead. With regards to the 'hand-gels', then this in itself requires due consideration because of its content base. People have been known to get slightly 'high' having cleaning the hands, and then smelling the after effect?.

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al's left peg

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Hello all,

My wife has found the views on this subject very interesting indeed. She qualified as a staff nurse 8 weeks ago and has recently started her first nursing job at the age of 45. After doing various roles in the NHS (Reception, medical records, and Admin and the like.

Her initial prompt to go into nursing was started by the sad loss of her Father a number of years back due to cancer. In his short time in hospital before he passed away, my wife got to know one or two of the nurses and seen the way they actually cared for her Father. She had to go to night school to improve in certain subjects she lacked in from her time at school, all the while bringing up 2 kids and running a house whilst I worked shifts as well. She also studied Biology to give her a better insight into a subject she knew relatively little about and then commenced her nursing diploma.

There is a way that you can get enrolled where you are backed by the hospital trust called a secondment. This gives you a financial backing throughout your training and it is a very limited number of spaces. My wife applied for that but the one space on her hospital trust at the time was given a to a consultants personal secretary.

My wife plodded on doing part time work and also enrolling on the nurse bank as a Health Care Assistant at weekends. She done this to learn the dirty things she would encounter and the hard work it would involve. Working weekends and nights and sacrificing a lot of things in the process, and learning how a ward worked.

She agrees wholeheartedly with the proposal of Jeremy Hunt as she has trained with some nurses, not a lot of them though, who even in their final year of training would turn a blind eye as they believe they are above doing the dirty work.

I am immensely proud of her and so is all of the family. My father was so proud of her and they were very close. Sadly he missed out on her qualifying and seeing her achieve what she worked so hard for, as he lost a battle with cancer in August last year. As it happens, her journey has now turned full circle and she works on the ward that cared for and looked after her own Father in his final days.

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Strawballs

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People say about the paperwork nurses have to do, most of that is in my view due to the compensation culture we now have in this country like most walks of life now everybody has to spend more time covering their back than they spend trying to do a proper job!!

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fourm member

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This talk about paperwork reminds me of a very unusual nurse I heard about. She had to make notes about what was happening in the ward for the hospital records and also make those same notes to be submitted as part of her training.

She had a pen in each hand and was writing the same thing in two places at once.

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