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stud walls


sunnystaines

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always had solid walls,but a bungalow i am looking at has stud walls. done a google but is full of stud finders not sure what studs are either.

any pros / cons re stud walls or any advice i need to know please.

no alterations planned other than re painting walls.

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Algerian peter ™

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We have stud walls in our detached bungalow, they are insulated between outer skins. They are mainly verticle wooden battons connected from floor to ceiling with the occasional wooden horizontal batton to strengthen the uprights. For all but the heaviest of fittings to the walls I use

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.askabuilder.co.uk/images/PLaster%2520Board%2520Fixings.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.askabuilder.co.uk/how-to/fix-to-plaster-board.html&h=336&w=448&sz=80&tbnid=0Th9zaxkpZ-kDM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=120&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dplasterboard%2Bfixings%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&zoom=1&q=plasterboard+fixings&usg=_UhJjd5arkGx8stu6WMH3yi3Kjo=&docid=Ty0NkiX5llDwFM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=KjJ1UcjiL-fm7Ab4r4CACg&ved=0CGgQ9QEwAw&dur=382

which expand when inserted to the wall.

When I need to hang anything heavy. I find a virticle or horizontal batton to anchor the fixing.

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Algerian peter ™

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Sorry about the URL

http://tinyurl.com/czxf84m

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spider9

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If needing to hang, or fix, anything heavy always try to locate the verticals or the dwangs. So you don't attach just to the plasterboard.

Running cables etc can be a bit more awkward if there is insulation present - but still normally a lot easier than raggling, or drilling, a brick wall. Of course you may be willing to accept wires run on the surface, but it never looks good.

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Ex plorer

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Stud walls, You say you are only painting the walls I always found it worth while using a wipe-able emulsion.

Treat any damp old water stained areas as it will come through emulsion, I found that well stirred gloss paint as good if not better as any stain covering substance.

A couple of thin coats should do it, always emulsion over it when dry to make sure the stain has gone.

Stud finders will find the upright timbers that hold the plaster board onto the wall I am not sure how a stud finder reacts if the plaster board has a foil coat on the back.

Never had anything but a basic stud wire and pipe finder so if you get a continuous beep from a stud finder you may have that type of plaster board.

Usual practice, the studs / upright timbers are 16 inches center to center as plaster boards are 4 foot wide.

Older houses lath and plaster can be 18 or 24 inches apart the walls will not be as smooth as a plaster board one.

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spider9

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I've always managed to find uprights and dwangs by 'knocking' the wall with a knuckle, it's quite an obvious sound change when you pass from wood to just plasterboard.

If you'll be decorating anyway, take a thin nail and knock through, you'll soon know if you hit wood! Then patch the tiny holes with a filler paste.

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Forum Editor

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wee eddie

The term 'Stud walls' is very widely used in the construction industry,

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Forum Editor

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For the record, the vertical timbers in a stud wall are the studs. The horizontal timber braces are referred to as 'Noggins'.

Nowadays you are likely to find foil-backed rigid foam panels (Celotex or similar) filling the wall as both an insulation material and an excellent sound barrier.

Often, in houses that have loft conversions it is common to find that the upper floor stud wall (below and in line with the apex of the roof above) has had the plaster/plasterboard removed from one side, and plywood panels screwed to the timber frame. This acts as a stiffener to take the increased load imposed from above, as the new loft ridge beam bears onto a post that sits on the top of the stud wall below.

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Forum Editor

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Bing.alau

"...the main ones are solid brickwork and I assume are the load bearing walls."

They are, but in many older houses - those dating from the 1800s and early 1900s particularly - stud walls can be load-bearing. For that reason it's always best to get an expert opinion before removing, or forming an opening in a stud wall.

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Aitchbee

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I have used 'Super Hooks' to hang mirrors amd other heavy wall-mounted objects, just like these ones in the link below;

http://www.amazon.ca/As-Seen-TV-Super-Hanger/dp/B003HGCBLU

Your local 'pound' shop might stock them.

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sunnystaines

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thanks for all the replies the building is about 12-15 years old.

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