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Where are the modern Pre-Fabs?


Bing.alau

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I wonder why, in these days of computing design and engineering improvements why we haven't seen an enterprising youngster turning out thousands of prefab houses to fill the gap in the housing market?

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spider9

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FE

Never had any trouble with planning when we used timber frame, but we always used brick finished, anyway. I've never been told that timber frame construction was looked at differently by planning, normally the firm make the kit to your own architect's instructions, and he should be aware of any planning restrictions affecting the proposed build. They also supplied full engineering certificates for the building control department.

The last one we did was a family sized three bedroom house, two storey, and the kit cost just under £20k with natural wood finishes and fitted wardrobes. It took four of us just a week to have it wind and watertight (with the help of a hired telehoist!).

The outer brickwork came to about £5k (labour and materials), and we certainly didn't feel that was any particular drawback - considering that it cost well over £6k just to get water, drainage and electric connected!. It's all relative, I suppose.

ps I thought most timber-frame houses had brick outers, except for 'log-cabin' type used as chalets etc (which I could understand planning being a bit particular about)?

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oresome

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Timber framed houses have excellent thermal properties as there's not a large mass of blockwork to heat up before the rooms feel warm.

On the debit side, the temperature gradient between the inside and the outside could lead to condensation between the walls (interstitial) and to prevent this, a vapour barrier needs to be maintained in tact. The timberframe will rot otherwise.

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canarieslover

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Just wait a while, the next generation of prefab is coming to a printer near you!! 3D house

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