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Should spelling,punctuation and grammar be part of the curricculam?


hssutton

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Schools could refuse to administer an exam in spelling, punctuation and grammar for 11-year-olds in England because it risks promoting a culture of “teaching to the test” at the expense of providing a broad curriculum.

Often I'm unable to understand the written word in various forums due to the lack of punctuation grammar and spelling. Of course this may be down to my age and the onset of senility.

I guess my real question is are the NUTs nuts?

Teachers call for boycott

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Aitchbee

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Encourage all of the young children in a primary class to do crosswords [at an appropriate level] ... perhaps teacher could hand out the same puzzle on a piece of 'full-scap' to all of the pupils and let them solve the puzzle together with [hopefully] contributions from everybody. [half-an-hour-a-week would be ok].

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hssutton

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Quickbeam

"You should have claimed it was a spot the deliberate mistake example."

No,no, I'm too honest to do that, or maybe to slow and simple to think of an excuse.

I was at my nephews on the 1st April at their daughters 8th birthday party. Apparently their school puts great emphasis on reading, writing and numeracy. Could it be due to the fact that the school is in a very quiet rural area of Lincolnshire where we still have grammar schools?

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lotvic

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How has system changed so much? I don't understand why Teachers are complaining about giving tests. Seems to me that Schools are going back to the much better system before the 'no-one is allowed to fail and you are all in the same class regardless of mixed abilities'.

I recall in the 50's & 60's we always had end of year exams and tests to enable School to decide which class to put us in for September. That was when you had Class A, B, C in Junior School and then the 11+ and A, B, C etc classes in Secondary Schools and end of year exams as well.

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fourm member

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'How has system changed so much?'

I'm not so sure it has. The NUT has always been the most political of unions. A friend of mine used to be a regional official for the NAS (before the merger with the UWT) and he is scathing about the selfishness of the NUT.

A cabin attendant once told me her job would be much more fun if there were no passengers. She was joking but I think the NUT believes schools exist for their benefit.

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morddwyd

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Teachers are no longer respected as they once were. They used to be up there alongside ministers of religion, doctors, JPs and others who could sign a passport photo, but they have devalued themselves.

I can remember the wave of horror in our school when a new teacher turned up without a tie (he was an art teacher, so it was reluctantly put down to his avant garde ideas!).

My cousin’s husband was a bookies’ settler. I don’t know what it meant but I presume it concerned some skill with figures.

She decided she did not like this, and he should become a teacher. He did, after only a six weeks course. He remained a teacher for the rest of his working days, and I’m sure he was a very good one, but he never had that underlying base of gravitas backed by knowledge that even the most popular old style teachers had.

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proudfoot

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My personal feelings re education are, the traditional methods are the best. I consider I had an excellent all round education. I am now 71 and I started my school life in 1946 at the age of 5 and left at 15.

At junior/infant school we had to learn how to spell 1o words a day and were tested the following day and learn the times tables up to 12 times.

I can spell pretty accurately and usually can see a word doesn't look right if I spell it wrongly. I can also multiply 2 numbers between 2 and 12 off pat, my children never managed that and were amazed.

I to my regret failed the "Scolarship Exam." to grammar school at 11 and went to the local Secondary Modern school. In those days you only sat O or A level examinations at grammar school so I left school without any paper qualifications.

I am retired now but managed through hard work at evening classes and day release studies to become an electrical engineer.

The problem these days is youngsters have it too easy and expect everything today without working for it.

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spider9

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"youngsters have it too easy "

I would disagree wholeheartedly with that statement.

Today's kids have more studying and exams to pass than ever we did, the pressure on them to 'do well' is enormous - and at the end of it they can see little hope of grabbing the few jobs that are available, anyway.

At least there were jobs for everyone in days past, now it's a few hours in a call centre (even for graduates) if you're lucky. Talk about a wasted generation!

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morddwyd

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"At least there were jobs for everyone in days past,"

A popular fallacy.

There were jobs, but they weren't for everyone. You took what was offered, with gratitude.

Now everybody wants to be a media consultant or an IT specialist, and if they can't get it they draw benefit.

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spider9

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morddwyd

"Now everybody wants to be a media consultant or an IT specialist, and if they can't get it they draw benefit"

Really, to say my statement was a fallacy and then to say the above shows how little knowledge you must have of the current youth employment situation.

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fourm member

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spider9

Ah, yes. 'the current youth employment situation'

You spend years at university working quite hard to get an above average degree only to find that not only is it hard to find a job but you can't afford anywhere to live in the only place where a job might be available.

Sorry, I didn't mean 'current'. I meant 1972 because that is the situation I faced that led me to go to Africa to work for nearly eight years.

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