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Speakers Corner


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New rules for younger drivers are being discussed


TopCat®
Resolved

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The rising number of accidents involving younger drivers is a matter of concern to all of us. Hardly a week passes by it seems without the media containing harrowing details of yet another young driver, or passenger, killed or severely injured in a smash. (For some reason today I am unable to include the link to the item as normal so here it is in full) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21937188

Authoritative discussions are now taking place that would place restrictions, yet to be finalised, on future young drivers. I hope the result of these discussions will help to ensure safer and better motorists in due course.

My suggestions are: After passing the test, perhaps a form of tamper-proof tachograph to be fitted for twelve months, or a speed restriction plate (50mph limit say) highly visible at the rear of the vehicle so other motorists would know it contained a younger driver. It would be very interesting to here your views on this serious matter. TC.

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HondaMan

Likes # 1

**The problem with young drivers is a lack of imagination meaning they don't envisage the outcome of their driving

Read more: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/forums/16/speakers-corner/4219572/new-rules-for-younger-drivers-are-being-discussed/#ixzz2OecWRtsG **

I have to agree with fourm member. I was always thought, by those "who should know" to be a steady and responsible young person. HA!

When I think back to some of the hairy things I did (soap-box racing, cycling and other hazardous activities) it now makes me shudder. It is largely the lack of imagination brought about by the lack of experience which is causing so many young people to take impossible risks, incorrectly estimate the risk, or behave just plain stupidly that is causing the problem.

In this society where normal "playing" risks are minimised by the "nanny society" children are denied the chance to learn, a sometime painful but hopefully not fatal lesson "if you do something stupid you may get hurt". We, the adult society have only ourselves to blame. Those that have children cosset and protect them beyond reason.

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wiz-king

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I remember the 'good old days' - push bike - NSU Quickly - ex PO Bantam - BSA GoldStar then a much modded 1000cc Triton.

Car wise -- Standard 8 - Ford Popular - Ford Cortina - Triumph spitfire.

I dont think young drivers are any worse than in my day but the environment is.

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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I dont think young drivers are any worse than in my day but the environment is.

Yes and No

more cars on road less room to make mistakes and get away with them.

however today's cars are a lot safer than your old Standard 8 or Spitfire, this of course means drivers feel safer and therefore take increased risks.

How to make drivers safer in cars --- take their mobile phones off them. ;0)

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Quickbeam

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Bet you wish you still had the Goldstar and Triton still:)

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Cymro.

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A probationary period of say six months after passing the driving test. During this time the young driver would have to display P for probationer plates. Not carry any young passengers. Not drive after darkness unless accompanied by a registered driving instructor. At the end of the probationary period another driving test would be necessary and that test would have to be a pass before the young driver is no longer considered a probationer.

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woodchip

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You have to change a young persons thinking, you cannot legislate against accidents and young drivers,showing off in front of is mates or girlfriend when he as a skin full or on drugs.

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Kevscar1

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Depends who teaches you, I was trained in the Polcie Force for my civvy licence then for a police one. No civvy trained driver would ever pass a police test.

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Quickbeam

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Not many police drivers would pass a civvy test tomorrow.

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spuds

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Kevscar1, when I was in the police force, they began to introduce 'civvies' as instructor's, from 'basics' upwards. Regarding the test, then this would depend on the 'approved' examiner.

I don't know how it applies nowadays, but with an 'old type' basic police licence, a police officer was 'in official' terms restricted on the use of "blues and two's". This caused quite a bit of concern at the time in my area, not sure about other areas.

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spuds

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What concerns me the most with young driver's, is how some seem to modify their car's beyond the original manufacturer's specifications, to perhaps a more souped-up version. I often wonder if their insurance companies are ever informed, before any eventful day?.

One thing that I have always stated from the days of my first licence, that any new driver should have 'restricted' driver plates displayed for a period of time. This can apply to say the older driver, who as held a motorbike licence years ago, and then ventures out on the open road with their new dream machine. Quite a number of these drivers have near mishaps or met with a very serious accident or fatality. And sometimes, not just involving themselves, but perhaps other innocent parties!.

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