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New rules for younger drivers are being discussed


TopCat®
Resolved

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The rising number of accidents involving younger drivers is a matter of concern to all of us. Hardly a week passes by it seems without the media containing harrowing details of yet another young driver, or passenger, killed or severely injured in a smash. (For some reason today I am unable to include the link to the item as normal so here it is in full) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21937188

Authoritative discussions are now taking place that would place restrictions, yet to be finalised, on future young drivers. I hope the result of these discussions will help to ensure safer and better motorists in due course.

My suggestions are: After passing the test, perhaps a form of tamper-proof tachograph to be fitted for twelve months, or a speed restriction plate (50mph limit say) highly visible at the rear of the vehicle so other motorists would know it contained a younger driver. It would be very interesting to here your views on this serious matter. TC.

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spider9

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WTM

Your 'hairy' moments were not the kind of things I was talking about doing as young inexperienced drivers would, like overtaking in dodgy places, under/overshooting on bends, misjudging braking distances etc.

Your examples are more akin to Eddie Stobart 'suspense' hour programmes!!( My favourite one "She had to deliver the load of cakes on time" !!).

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fourm member

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WTM

The only 20mph limits on main roads I've seen have been part-time on roads passing schools. They operate at times when children are coming and going. I assume you've seen other types.

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Quickbeam

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Was it also WTM that used to drive these big earth scrapers down the M1 in the '60s at 80mph?

It used to be quite common for a convoy of these to drive from one site to another without using low loaders. The old open cab types with the drivers wearing goggles and racing each other! How times have changed...

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spuds

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fourm member as brought up a good point about 20mph signs outside schools. Because can anyone actually tell me how these are enforced?.

Around my area, and no doubt many others, the signs give no reference to "when children are coming and going". In the main the signs suggest possibly 'when the school is in use'.

A number of school's have evening and weekend class's plus other functions or events on, after supposedly 'school hours'?.

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spuds

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QB

I remember those days very well. No such thing as elf n safety then. First to the ale house on some occasions?.

Even recall seeing one lorry chassis delivery driver, using a couple of tied down beer crates for a seat, when it was pouring down with rain :O(

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beeuuem

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"Fruit Bat /\0/\ Unfortunately the death rate on the roads has risen in the last decade mostly killing pedestrians not drivers."

From https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reported-road-casualties-great-britain-annual-report-2011 Statistical Release – Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain: 2011 Annual Report- Page 2 of 10

Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: 2011 Annual Report Introduction Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain Annual Report: 2011 presents detailed statistics about the circumstances of personal injury accidents, including the types of vehicles involved, the resulting casualties, and factors which may contribute to accidents happening. Most of the statistics in the publication are based on information about accidents reported to the police (using ‘STATS 19’ forms). However, other sources such as mortality, survey and hospital data are also used as well as population and traffic data to provide a wider context. In addition to detailed tables there are six articles containing further analysis on specific road safety topics.

an overview and trends in reported road casualties a valuation of road accidents and casualties drinking and driving contributory factors in accidents self-reported drink and drug driving hospital admissions data on road casualties

Not all non-fatal accidents are reported to the police. The regular annual article on survey data on road traffic accidents, which includes an overall estimate of total casualties, has not been updated this year because 2011 National Travel Survey data are not yet available. Our best current estimate is that the total number of road casualties in Great Britain, including those not reported to police, is within the range 660 thousand to 800 thousand with a central estimate of 730 thousand. The estimates will be updated in 2013.

This publication summarises key points from each article.

  1. Overview and trends in reported road casualties

Summary This article reviews the main trends in the number of reported road accident casualties in Great Britain in 2011 compared with recent years. Figures for the Strategic Framework for Road Safety.

  1. outcome indicators used to monitor progress on road safety are also included. Figures are primarily derived from information about accidents reported to the police.

    There were a total of 203,950 casualties of all severities in road accidents reported to the police, 2 per cent lower than in 2010. 1,901 people were killed, 3 per cent higher than in 2010, 23,122 were seriously injured (up 2 per cent) and 178,927 were slightly injured (down 3 per cent). Motor vehicle traffic increased very slightly (0.2 per cent) over the same period.

    The number of fatalities rose for pedestrian and car occupants, by 12 and 6 per cent respectively compared to 2010 but fell for other types of road user. Motorcyclist fatalities fell by 10 per cent, pedal cyclists by 4 per cent and 22 per for bus and coach occupants.

    The number of fatalities was 32 per cent lower and killed or seriously injured casualties were 17 per cent lower than the 2005-2009 average. The rates per billion vehicle miles were 31 per cent and 15 per cent respectively lower than the 2005-2009 average.

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fourm member

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spider9

Round our way, the signs have flashing lights to indicate when the 20 mph is in force. They only operate morning, lunchtime and afternoon during term time.

I don't know if the schools have control or if the signs are programmed to know when school holidays are.

Incidentally, in Malta they close the roads passing schools at the times the children are coming and going. If there is not a alternative route you have to wait.

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carver

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"Incidentally, in Malta they close the roads passing schools at the times the children are coming and going. If there is not a alternative route you have to wait."

Try that in this country and hardly any children would get to or from school.

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Bing.alau

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WTM. It still looks from your earlier posting, as if you reckon you personally are better than all other drivers. Have you ever driven a tank? If so was it on Salisbury plain or was it in Iraq or somewhere equally daunting?

The opinion of one police officer doesn't count for much either. He was probably buttering up to you and your mates.

If you entered a competition for driving skills would you be confident of winning it? If you say "yes" then you have a really big head haven't you? Maybe I have got the wrong impression from your posting but that's how it seems.

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john bunyan

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fourm member

We have a 20 mph limit in my local village; there is a 20 mph one in old Portsmouth near the Dockyard. I seem to remember there is one in Ham near Richmond, so I believe there are quite a few around the country.

Re drivers, I have just got my third 3 yearly one for over 70's and I suppose folk know that if you wish to keep a C licence (lorries up to 8 tonnes) , or a D (minibuses 9 - 16 passengers - not for hire or reward) , you need a medical (which I had, in case by remote chance I wanted to drive a heavier vehicle) akin to the HGV one, or you lose the permissions for the latter and are only allowed to drive cars up to 3.5 tonnes (With same trailers if you have that on the licence). Obviously there are "doddery" older drivers but I suspect far fewer than dangerous "boy racers" In Australia , for many years you get a green "P" licence for the first, I think, year after the test. Perhaps that should apply here with a second test at night including motorways.

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