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Speakers Corner


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New rules for younger drivers are being discussed


TopCat®
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The rising number of accidents involving younger drivers is a matter of concern to all of us. Hardly a week passes by it seems without the media containing harrowing details of yet another young driver, or passenger, killed or severely injured in a smash. (For some reason today I am unable to include the link to the item as normal so here it is in full) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21937188

Authoritative discussions are now taking place that would place restrictions, yet to be finalised, on future young drivers. I hope the result of these discussions will help to ensure safer and better motorists in due course.

My suggestions are: After passing the test, perhaps a form of tamper-proof tachograph to be fitted for twelve months, or a speed restriction plate (50mph limit say) highly visible at the rear of the vehicle so other motorists would know it contained a younger driver. It would be very interesting to here your views on this serious matter. TC.

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carver

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spider9 speeding is not a criminal offence and only some thing like 1.5% of accidents are caused by people breaking the speed limit more are caused by people who have bad eye sight.

Road crashes caused by bad eyesight create an estimated 2,900 casualties and cost £33m per year, a recent survey carried out by a car insurance provider found

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spider9

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carver

I will change the word to 'illegal' then.

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oresome

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Excessive speed resulted in 25% of the road fatalities in 2011.

Excessive speed was a factor in 12% of road traffic accidents.

I don't think speed is as benign a factor as Carver believes.

Figures from Dept of Transport annual report.

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woodchip

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Figures no matter ware they come from can and are manipulated to serve what purpose the manipulator wants to do with them. I do not take a lot of note of them as Humans and numbers are constantly changing

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fourm member

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carver

'only some thing like 1.5% of accidents are caused by people breaking the speed limit'

and

'And 3% [of fatal accidents] were caused by speeding'

I know the Mail in 2008 said only 3% of accidents were caused by speeding and claimed that is what government figures show but it ain't so.

The Department of Transport statistics are based on something called the On The Spot (OTS) survey. This is information gathered by police officers on the scene. It is, largely, a subjective assessment and, since the officer is looking at a static scene, excessive or inappropriate speed is hard to determine.

'Driving too fast' isn't a helpful description of the cause of an accident because it is possible to drive too fast and not have an accident.

In 2011 exceeding the speed limit was reported as a factor in 5% of accidents but this was 14% of fatal accidents. Add travelling too fast for the conditions and you are up to 25% of all fatal accidents.

Failing to look properly was reported in 42% of all accidents but, for fatal accidents, the most frequently reported factor was loss of control. You don't need statistics to tell you that loss of control is more likely to happen at higher speed and that the outcome of loss of control is going to be more serious at higher speed.

As you said, a 10mph speed limit, if enforced, would greatly reduce accidents. That's a very good way to illustrate that driving law is always a compromise between reducing accidents and allowing travel to take place at all.

But making those compromises relies on a realistic assessment of the dangers and distorting statistics to claim that speed does not kill simply isn't helpful.

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Bing.alau

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If speeding isn't a criminal offence then it damn well should be.

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fourm member

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Bing.alau

Don't worry. Speeding is a criminal offence. Generally, however, it does not result in an offender getting a criminal record.

Section 89 (1) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 says;

'A person who drives a motor vehicle on a road at a speed exceeding a limit imposed by or under any enactment to which this section applies shall be guilty of an offence.'

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fourm member

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Sorry, oresome. You posted while I was typing.

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spider9

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carver

So, 'illegal' reverts back to 'criminal' then!!

Thanks, fourm member!

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woodchip

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I think that we should have a man walking in front of every car with a RED FLAG to warn people so they did no step out in front of a speeding car, this would also get unemployment down

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