We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Can anybody recommend a good book or three? (Kindle).


Bing.alau
Resolved

Likes # 0

I am looking for something in the same vein as Neville Norway Schute used to write. I have read all his books and wish he were still writing. But I also like other styles of writing and one I can recommend to others is one I have recently finished "The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out Of The Window And Disappeared" by Jonasson Jonas. The title put me off at first, but I enjoyed the history lesson and the crime. I also enjoyed the Lawrence Block "Hit Man" series and the Stieg Larsson "Girl" books.

Also has anybody changed over to the Kindle Paperwhite gadget yet? If so how do pictures and maps appear on it? Are they clear enough to see? It would be nice if Kindle could upgrade my keyboard model to a paperwhite job.

Like this post
Quickbeam

Likes # 0

I've just finished True Grit, the book that inspired two very good films and is a good read.

Also on the wild west theme are Lonesome Dove, which was a great mini series, also a good adventure read.

Like this post
Bing.alau

Likes # 0

Thanks for all the recent offerings of authors' names everybody. I will look them up and add any I think I may like to my list. I have read a few of the Bourne books and many Mark Twain books in my time. Some of them come free with Kindle when you buy the gadget.

FE. / Woolwell I got about half way through "The Riddle Of The Sands" book and started thinking I hope it improves soon, but it didn't look as if it was going to so I gave up. I could imagine sailing enthusiasts enjoying it and although I have done a bit of sailing way back, it wasn't enough to keep me interested. Maybe the style of writing isn't to my taste as well. I am not modern myself but don't like any beating about the bush. Anyway I have plenty of authors to look up now and with a week or so in Spain also coming up I am looking forward to sitting by the poolside reading and playing scrabble...So once again "Thanks" to all contributors.

Like this post
Woolwell

Likes # 0

You may like Clive Cussler's books.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

"The Riddle Of The Sands" isn't what you would call an easy read - for one thing it was written quite a long time ago, and styles change. It's much admired as a literary work, and of course for anyone interested in military strategy it's a must-read book.

I'm currently reading 'Wolf Hall' by Hilary Mantel. It won the Booker prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and has been referred to as one of the greatest historical novels ever written. It's about Thomas Cromwell, and as I'm a Tudor history fanatic it's right up my street. It's over 600 pages long, so would make an ideal holiday read if that kind of thing interests you.

Mantel has written a sequel called 'Bring up the bodies', and that won the Booker prize last year, making Hilary only the third author in the history of the award to win it twice. I have 'Bring up the bodies' waiting to be opened, and in due course there will be a further novel in the trilogy.

If you are interested in historical fiction of the highest quality based on scrupulous research and an expert knowledge of the subject matter you couldn't do better than to read these two books.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

'isn't what you would call an easy read'

I've just finished 'Ulysses' on my Kindle. The paperback is 736 pages and I don't think I could have held such a huge tome for the time it took me to read it.

Like this post
Bing.alau

Likes # 0

FE. Thanks I will look them up. Someone else mentioned them to me as well. I used to hate history at school, but now I like it, I tend to like reading about recent history but I did enjoy one on my Kindle last year, about the kings and queens of England and how tough the laws were in those days. I don't think they would allow the hanging/disembowelling and quartering type of thing these days. Too much softness.

Like this post
Quickbeam

Likes # 0

If you like history, the fairly recent (2008) Dambusters by Max Aurthur is very gripping account, and tomorrow is the 70th anniversary with a Lancaster flyover at Derwent reservoir, weather permitting.

It goes into a lot of detail that wasn't available to the writer of the 1951 book that inspired the classic film on account of the 30 secrecy rules. When you start the bomb run you feel the fear that they must have felt.

Like this post
Bing.alau

Likes # 0

Quickbeam. Sounds good. I shall have a look at it. Thanks.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Contactless payments to launch on London public transport this year

IDG UK Sites

How to join Apple's OS X Beta Seed Program: Get OS X Yosemite on your Mac before public release

IDG UK Sites

Why the BBC iPlayer outage was caused by a DDoS attack: Topsy and Tim isn't *that* popular

IDG UK Sites

NASA offers free 3D models of satellites, probes and planets for 3D printing and animation projects