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What should Happen to all the Frozen Food Withdrawn


proudfoot

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What should happen to the frozen food withdrawn by the supermarkets and manufacturers. It has been suggested in Germany that it should be given to the poor. My feeling are as long as it fit for human consumption it should be marked as " May Contain Horsemeat" and sold at a cheaper price. I have no problem eating horsemeat as long as it is made clear, in fact I would like to try it. I eat beef, lamb, pork,rabbit, hare and chicken. I have also eaten ostrich which tastes similar to beef but very low in clorestrol and venison.

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spuds

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Forum Editor

I am surprised that you have stated that, because I would assume that the major supermarkets have already looked into the legal side about their contracts and returns with their suppliers, who in turn will make claims against their suppliers.

There's also the problem of 'payment, distribution and holding arrangements', which may lead to some supermarkets not yet having paid for the goods they have on their stores. So in actual fact the supermarket may not own the goods?.

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spuds

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Going back on giving to the needy, would cause major issues due to the products being frozen, which in itself would need special arrangements with further high costs.

Most food processing plants have facilities for end product output, and very limited space for returns, so in all probabilities any suspect food would go out of the human food consumption market.

As an example, a few years ago, there was the big problem of the 'food mountains', when storage was costing massive amounts of finance?.

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rdave13

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See my post of 11:19PM spuds.

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spuds

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rdave13 - Whoops I didn't really notice that.

But having friends who run a food processing factory, and family who use to deal with the major supermarket's and 'high street' retail outlets, I thought it was worth a mention ;o)

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Forum Editor

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spuds

Regardless of who technically owns the affected food at any given point, it is the owners' decision as to what happens to it when it's withdrawn from sale.

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rdave13

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spuds- absolutely worth a mention. I work in a 'food' processing plant, actually a confectionery inclusion plant. Supply major companies and processes are strictly controlled. guffaw.......

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spuds

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Forum Editor

You stated "The food belongs to the supermarkets...", I was merely pointing out that that was not necessarily the case.

It would appear that you have corrected yourself by possibly now stating "Regardless - owners' decision", which is an entirely different comment to the one you made earlier.

Whatever the case, the supermarket's might lose a bit of face over this issue, but it will soon blow over like other major food recalls have done.

I would strongly suspect that the supermarket's won't lose out to much financially over the long-term. Going by the comments and television interviews and documentaries being made, some of the public might be in favour of horse meat sales here in the UK. People use to eat horse meat or flesh on a regular basis here in the UK also whale blubber/meat. Supermarket's have already introduced various 'exotic' meats to their counters over the years as experiments, and no doubt horse meat might be the next quietly introduced experiment from some outlets. Where's there money to be made, there are no bounds?.

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Forum Editor

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spuds

The point I was making is that, regardless of the technicalities of ownership, and in many cases it will be the supermarkets, the owners of the food can do whatever they like with it.

If the supermarkets have paid for it they can choose to waste it, or take action to recover their losses from the processing company.

Supermarkets shouldn't lose face, as you put it, over this because it isn't their fault. They've all reacted rapidly, once they determined that horsemeat had been added to products, and that's what counts. This is a labelling issue, not a health problem.

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Quickbeam

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I would imagine that most of the fresh food with horse in it has already been destroyed. The frozen food would have a repackaging cost attached to it that would probably make it economically unprofitable to try and sell at the expected knock down price, so it'll probably all end up as waste at the expense of the manufacturer who will have to try and get compensation from the meat suppliers who will no doubt start to go bankrupt pretty quickly.

There won't be any winners in this, and the supermarkets will probably lose the least.

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fourm member

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rdave13

'Something is certainly happening in this country to make us poorer than third world countries'

The words of someone who has absolutely no concept of what poverty in a Third World Country is.

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