We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Got that wonderful shrinking feeling?


TopCat®
Resolved

Likes # 0

Well this Japanese building has as it is slowly demolished floor by floor to ground level. No fuss, no inconvenience, explosives or dirt just a remarkable way of getting rid of a building with modern technology.

I can see this demolition method catching on around the world which will, no doubt, cause some consternation to the big bang brigade. What say you? TC.

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

Referring to buildings of the 80's, seems to hit the news on a frequent basis, as to how some of these structures were of poor design, stability or eventually 'fit for purpose'.

Tower blocks were once the planner's dream of resolving homeless issues, but look how many tower blocks built within the last 40/50 years have now gone by their sell by date. This just doesn't include housing, but commercial enterprise properties as well. Even 'modern' hospitals are not immune.

The Victorian builders had some great ideas and structures, and how many of those are still rock solid, and will remain so for further generations?.

Talking about demolition from top to bottom, then perhaps look no further than Fred Dibnah's adventures!.

Going on explosive commercial demolition, I recall the days when this was fairly new, and I was involved with some very old solid crane block removals at the side of the Thames in Greenwich. As I said, the whole idea of confined demolition was fairly new, and the 'expert' had to be brought in from Germany, because at the time this was the only option.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

WTM

It's not being done from the bottom up. It's being done from a few floors down from the roof.

My guess would be that leaving the roof on is reducing the amount of dust that escapes. That, I would imagine, is a major consideration.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

I was one of the last people to stay in the old Hilton Hotel in Hong Kong before it was demolished.

The economic benefits of removing it and replacing it with a much bigger multi-purpose tower were huge and, I'm sure, there will be a huge income increase in this case even with this high cost removal.

But that's looking just at one building in isolation.

Countrywide or worldwide, I wonder if this is an acceptable use of resources.

Like this post
bumpkin

Likes # 0

Fourm member. Looking closely at the video I can see you mean about a few floors down from the top, so what is the grey bit at the top that is about 4 stories high, is this a surround of some sort or part of the building itself.

Like this post  

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Best Black Friday 2014 tech deals: Get bargains on smartphones, tablets, laptops and more

IDG UK Sites

What the Internet of Things will look like in 2015: homes will get smarter, people might get fitter

IDG UK Sites

See how Trunk's animated ad helped Ade Edmondson plug The Car Buying Service

IDG UK Sites

Yosemite tips: Complete Guide to OS X Yosemite