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Greetings


Chronos the 2nd

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Xin Nian Kuai Le. :)

Gong Hei Fard Choy. :)

Xing Ni Ju Yi. :)

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Forum Editor

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spuds

"This can apply to any country that as its celebrations, I have been in Hong Kong in a Chinese New Year, and made many new friends."

I wasn't talking about making friends, or the celebrations themselves, I was referring the sheer numbers involved as people travel home to their families.

No other country has over 200 million people travelling home at New year.

I've witnessed the Hong Kong celebrations, and they don't even come close to those in some of the Chinese Mainland cities.

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Forum Editor

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Actually, the traditional Mandarin greeting is: "Gong Xi Fa Ca!" which means 'here's wishing you prosperity!'

Then, on the first day of the new year people greet each other with “Guo Nian”.

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Forum Editor

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"So can someone tell me why this site does not allow me to post Happy New year in Chinese characters then?"

I would have thought it was obvious; this is a site that is on a .co.uk domain, and it's configured for the English language, not Chinese.

The title field sees the Chinese characters as unrecognisable symbols, and makes a substition.

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Chronos the 2nd

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I would have thought it was obvious

Thank you for your help.

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Forum Editor

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Chronos the 2nd

No problem, You're more than welcome.

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john bunyan

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Chronos the 2nd

A Happy New year to you too. Last night, and tonight my wife and I had and are having a Chinese dinner, at home - not take away`- as we usually do on Chinese New Year. I have had many good friends in the Chinese diaspora, mainly in Malaysia and Singapore. I admire their culture greatly,and their work ethic. I regret not leaning one of the Chinese languages, apart from the sheer difficulty, my friends are mostly Hokkien or Tou Chou ; local take aways are mostly Cantonese and the official language and that of Singapore, where I often used to visit , is Mandarin. Good for them they share a common written language.

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Bing.alau

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Chronos the 2nd. I actually don't know how it is spelled but the way I have always remembered it is as "Kung Hei Fat Choi" or as "Kung Hii Fatt Choi". I don't think a Chinese person would pull you up for saying either way and probably wouldn't notice a westerner mispronouncing it. Like us they will be just glad you are wishing them prosperity. I imagine with all the dialects different areas have different ways of saying the same thing anyway. The staff in my local chippy just smile away happily. What they think I can't imagine. Probably "strupid Engrishman". And in my case they would be right.

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rickf

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Interesting to see so much interest in Chinese New Year. It is heartening for me as a British Chinese living here. Even more interesting is the mention of "Tou Chou" which is my dialect except that we pronounced it as Teo Chew, the main dialect in Singapore although most tend to speak Mandarin. Chinese over here are mainly Cantonese. So much so that when I first went to London's Chinatown in the late 60 's they said I was not Chinese simply because I could'nt speak it.

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flycatcher1

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On the Star Ferry, second class best trip in the world, I convinced a gullible girl that the Ferries were built in England and sailed out to HK. Well, there was a plaque that said HULL BUILT 1947.

The Chinese really know how to enjoy themselves at New Year and always try to go home as the FE remarked. I remember the crowds at the Railway Station. Happy Days, $HK14 to the £ and San Mig 95cents a pint.

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fourm member

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'I remember the crowds at the Railway Station'

My first trip to China was from Hong Kong. I was with a Hong Kong Chinese and we went into China on the ferry and back to Hong Kong on the train.

It was shortly before new year and my colleague thought it would be a jolly jape to take me onto the main station concourse before explaining that we would be leaving from the international departure area.

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