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What Do They Hope To Gain By Getting Married?


Bing.alau
Resolved

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Is there any monetary gain when homosexuals obtain the right to get married? Or is there some other gains that I know nothing about? In other words why do they want it so badly? Surely they should be content with things as they are now?

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spuds

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Its a strange world we seem to live in, because a short time ago, I was watching the Parliament program on television, and a number of MP's were clearly stating that Parliament had more pressing things to get on with, or terms and words to that effect.

Personally, I couldn't really care less if same sex couples wants to marry or not. What I do care about, is the fact that I am constantly being told that its all for equality, which everyone deserves and should expect. Then at the same time, my equality rights are being eroded around me, by perhaps a minority?.

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Kevscar1

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It's just the tip of the iceberg. I wonder when you will be allowed to marry sheep

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robgf

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Kevscar1

"I wonder when you will be allowed to marry sheep"

That's a really BAAAAAAd idea, you could get fleeced during the divorce.

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kad60

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Kevscar1,had to copy and paste the final part of that sentence 1;06am,came up with this.There must be a lot of broken 'glass houses' over this subject,my sister,who is gay,is against the idea but other family members are for so even within the 'community' there are issues.

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Quickbeam

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I reckon that 10 years from now we'll wonder what all the fuss was about.

Just like nearly 10 years after the same sex civil ceremonies were introduced, and nearly 50 years since the legalisation of homosexuality, we'll look back and wonder why the law had ever needed to be used to control the population over the way nature made some.

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chub_tor

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I have a lesbian niece who with her chosen life partner went through the legal civil partnership procedure and then held a humanist marriage ceremony in front of dozens of their family and friends. I was part of that ceremony and very proud of her and her partner for they showed great courage in the face of a lot of opposition from some of their work colleagues. For them it was just what they wanted and they have no desire to get married in a church or in a register office even if they now legally could.

According to This article in the Guardian it will be illegal for the Church of England to conduct gay marriages once the bill has passed into law but other churches may do so if they wish. And there is one line in that article that bothers me "Some Churches, such as the Quakers and Unitarians, have already decided to opt in to allowing gay marriages and others, including the Church of England, might do so in the future."

And this raises the issue that should my niece and her partner change their minds and go to their local non C of E church official and say "we would really like to be married in your nice little country church which is really pretty" and he says "No", what then?

They are legally entitled to be married, so will they be legally entitled to challenge a refusal to be married in a place of their choice? Will there be an Appeals procedure? How far up the scale of appeals can it go? Will the official be breaking the law by his refusal? If so what would his punishment be? This has all the signs of making a lot of money for the legal profession. Finally let's not forget about what could happen in the future should they decide to divorce..... how will that be handled?

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Quickbeam

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"...and he says "No", what then?"

This was asked on the radio the other day. The man replying thought that if we were the same as churches in most of Europe (I know for sure Italy falls into this as I have an Italian niece) in that before a church wedding you had to have a legal civil wedding. Without that civil wedding first, the church wedding is not a legal wedding. In fact it's just a pretty for the guests.

But don't think that NO doesn't happen right now with male/female couples. If the vicar thinks that your wedding will be a trashy vulgar affair that doesn't fit with the idyl image of his village, he can say NO to that couple's request. That doesn't mean they can't get married at all though, just not in my quaint church!

"what could happen in the future should they decide to divorce"

I would expect that one legalised, it's automatically handled the same any any other divorce. With boxing gloves in the back yard...

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Forum Editor

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The Church of England grants an absolute right to all British citizens with no former spouse still living to be married in their local Parish church, whether or not they attend it as a place of worship. The Church's priest does not have any discretion in the matter. If you want to marry in a church that is not your local parish one the priest does have discretion.

No registrar needs to be present at Church of England marriages, as Church of England priests are permitted to act as registrars. The marriage ceremony itself is a legally binding act in that respect.

The Church's position on same sex marriage is well known; it does not support any law that seeks to change the historically accepted definition of marriage as being a union between a man and a woman.

The view of some experts is that a church's refusal to marry same sex couples would not survive a legal challenge before the European Court of Human Rights.

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spuds

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Reading some of the comments being made, I wonder what would happen, as part of reading the Banns, if someone objected, on whatever grounds.

I have friends who are supposedly 'gay', but they do not refer to themselves a 'gay' or belonging to a select group. They just get on with there own lives, doing what they think is right for themselves, and not really caring about what others want or think. Especially if it may mean, that they have lawmaker's who are making decisions, that they themselves (lawmakers) are possibly not suitable or experienced in making, but basing their 'facts' on what they are being told?.

One particular female friend had a number of supposedly 'for life' female partnerships, from a young age to her early/mid thirties. This all changed, and she is now happily married to a male, and the mother of two great and loving children.

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Bing.alau

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In this world everything boils down to money. I can't see how getting married or having a same sex civil partnership makes any difference. Surely they are still next of kin by law in both instances? But something tells me there must be a monetary advantage/disadvantage somewhere. Is it something to do with divorce? Or is it to do with inheritance? I'm not worried about it in the least except as someone has already mentioned, it is gong to be a gold mine for lawyers.

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