We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

I'm a Daddy


Macscouse
Resolved

Likes # 0

Up here in the North of Scotland, snowdrops are popping out everywhere in my garden, and the crocuses (crocii?) are not far behind. What's the betting that there will be snow on the Cairgorm in June?

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

wee eddie

the Gulf stream, and prevailing winds blowing off the sea account for higher mean temperatures in that part of Scotland.

Like this post
Bing.alau

Likes # 0

I just thought he was telling fibs as usual. There's no lead in his pencil now. Like me, he probably used it all up years ago.

Like this post
SimpleSimon1

Likes # 0

fourm member

"Last year Chinese supermarkets in Bristol were selling bunches of daffodils with unopened buds and some people bought them as chives."

I know I shouldn't and it's probably very unkind but ROFL.

I'll send it on to all my Cornish relatives but I guess it will simply confirm their opinions that intelligent life ends at the Tamar bridge!

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

SimpleSimon1

Schadenfreude is a normal reaction and, luckily, eating daffodils only results in a nasty stomach upset for a few days.

Usually it is people eating the bulbs thinking they are onions.

Like this post
john bunyan

Likes # 0

During the WW2, some Dutch ate Tulip bulbs, which are less poisonous than daffodil ones. I would not eat either and hope no one is encouraged to do so.BTW I thought ROFL was obscure and am impressed by fm's Schadenfreude synonym was impressive.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

"Usually it is people eating the bulbs thinking they are onions."

On that note, I once made a huge fool of myself in a posh Thailand hotel. I had dined in the restaurant - beautiful food - with my wife, and as we walked back out into the vast hotel lobby I noticed, by the entrance to the restaurant a small table, on which was a big bowl piled high with choice Macadamia nuts, a particular favourite of mine. Being a greedy pig I grabbed a handful of the nuts and stuffed them into my mouth, chomping greedily.

You've guessed it, they weren't nuts but big, juicy, industrial strength peeled garlic cloves. The lobby was crowded with sophisticated people, and there I was, with my mouth on fire, unable to do anything but run for the ornamental fish fountain and give the exotic fish a garlic meal.

My wife made for the lift, not wanting to be associated with the man that everyone was staring at.

Like this post
SimpleSimon1

Likes # 0

FE

With apologies to John Bunyan and a healthy does of 'it could happen to anyone' ROTFLOL and BAGL (OK, I'll stop with the acronyms, now)

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

john bunyan

The Dutch removed the outer layers and the very centre of the tulips before drying them and grinding them to make a sort of flour for making bread.

No-one knows whether the toxins are strongest in the centre, which they discarded, or whether cooking destroyed them. But it shows how serious the Hunger Winter was if people were that desparate.

Like this post
john bunyan

Likes # 0

fourm member

I worked in The Netherlands for 10 years 1987 - 1997. A Dutch colleague lived as a teenager just outside the Hague during the war, and told me many stories, including the tulip one. He hated the Germans, - on one occasion his village postie, who was deaf, failed to stop his bike when a German soldier shouted to halt (at his back). The soldier shot the old boy dead. My friend was very grateful to the RAF for dropping food soon after the Germans left.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

john bunyan

There is usually an upside to even the worst situation. Scientists have learned a lot about the long-term effects of hunger by studying the Dutch. That work may help to reduce the harm done by modern day famines.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 review: The best iPad mini and Nexus 7 rival tablet around

IDG UK Sites

Which Mac? Complete Apple Mac buyers guide for 2014

IDG UK Sites

Mobile email is powerful and useful - but also hopelessly intrusive

IDG UK Sites

Samsung lights up London skyline with Midnight Rainbow