We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
 
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

EU In/Out? Is a referendum the best way?


spider9
Resolved

Likes # 0

I'd always thought we were a Parliamentary Democracy, and, as such, we elect paid representatives to take difficult decisions on our behalf.

Membership of Europe is a difficult , complicated topic, and most people (including myself) would be hard pushed to appreciate all the pros and cons - so the populace will now be bombarded by media propaganda aimed at the lowest common denominator, I suspect.

Loads of 'crazy' EU stories will emerge and be fed to the Great British public, with 'good' EU stories being more difficult to show. Hence the media barons will, once again, get their way and politicians can then 'blame' us if it turns out bad.

Weak leadership I'm afraid.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

Aitchbee

'It's so obvious.'

Well, not to me it isn't. I have no idea what you are on about.

Like this post
namtas

Likes # 0

forum member, you asked

Just how do you think there can be 'mutually beneficial trading arrangements' if the UK is outside the EU?

Then in reply you say its not about trading anyway,

It's about the German government wanting a new pension fund manager and, at present, having to ask UK firms to tender.

I am becoming confused

Like this post
namtas

Likes # 0

forum member, you cannot have it both ways, you asked

Just how do you think there can be 'mutually beneficial trading arrangements' if the UK is outside the EU?

Instead of answering the question in reply you say its not about trading anyway,

It's about the German government wanting a new pension fund manager and, at present, having to ask UK firms to tender.

I am becoming confused

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

namtas

The rules of the single market part of the EU say that public bodies have to put out tenders for goods and services above a certain value. Those tenders have to go to all EU states.

Because we are in the EU we get the chance to supply products and services to lots of bodies who would shut us out if we left the EU.

If you don't recognise that as trading, it might explain why you can't see the good being in the EU does.

Like this post
Flak999

Likes # 0

fourm member

I'm actually not interested in trying to persuade anyone to change their views.

Some people less charitable than me, might see the white flag being waved with that answer! I definitely have the feeling with you, that you just like an argument for the sake of it rather than actually believing what you say.

There's nothing wrong with that, discussion boards all over the internet are filled with people doing exactly the same thing.

It's what passes for sport in cyberspace. ;-)

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

There will be millions of words written about this issue over the next couple of years, and a good few of them will be in this forum.

Meanwhile, we have an economic recovery to make,and I'm going to focus on that, rather than on something that might never happen. I'll leave this thread to those who want to carry on with it.

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

Possibly off subject slightly, but fourm member seems to emphasis that trading with the EU as to go out on tender to all EU states. I have just been watching the Parliament program on Freeview with the Select Committee asking questions about the recent burger/horsemeat scare. On the program was a Tesco senior representative, who was reporting that the horsemeat originated from a now unknown source in Poland, something that Tesco knew nothing about. Yet at the same time, the Tesco representative was stating that Tesco have a very strict policy on knowing about the products they sell, where it comes from, and how it is produced.

This sort of incident reminds me of the stories about olive groves and vineyards that received large grants, but never really existed in the form or shape claimed.

Now I wonder what happened to the checks or quality controls that should have been picked up at the tendering stages?.

The UK imports a vast amount of food and other manufactured products from outside the EU, as do many other EU countries who trade outside the union. So perhaps on that basis alone, keeping it in the EU doesn't really apply, and never as done.

Like this post
fourm member

Likes # 0

Flak999

I have better things to do with my time than talk to a brick wall, as the saying goes.

My participation in this thread has mostly been to point out the myth that European political unity was never mentioned before the 1975 referendum.

That takes us right back to the start of the thread.

People calling for a referendum have admitted that the public didn't pay attention to the issues in 1975. Perhaps they'll claim that 'lessons have been learned' and they'll pay more attention this time.

Like this post
Quickbeam

Likes # 0

It'll all no doubt be repeated on an annual basis until the big vote, if we get it.

Like this post
flycatcher1

Likes # 0

On Radio Four this morning I heard Ken Clarke, a well known Pro European, list some things that had to be changed in Europe. The one thing that he did not enlarge on was how the changes were to be made.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Amazon 3D smartphone release date, price and spec: The hologram phone?

IDG UK Sites

You're never alone with a clone: How the App Store got taken over by copycats

IDG UK Sites

PCs vs consoles: PCs still pwn when it comes to gaming (and everything else)

IDG UK Sites

The art of rebranding: Creative agency The Neighbourhood explains how & why it rebranded