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How do you store your photographs?


Forum Editor

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In another thread we've been discussing the demise of Jessops, the well-known chain of photographic stores. Reasons for their collapse have generally been agreed to be the changes in the way that people buy cameras, and possibly the fact that phone cameras are nowadays being used by young people as their only way of taking photographs.

I was struck by one of Quickbeam's posts, in which he said (about younger people)

*"When they change phones they don't even keep copies of the photos that were taken on today's iWow phone. The photo content is considered as obsolete as the phone. Which means in 20/30 years time they won't find happy memories of the past at the back of the sock drawer when they find the postcard prints and negatives of holidays taken when they were still slim and fresh faced."*

and I got to wondering how you store your photographic images. Do you archive them on your computer hard drive, looking at them when the thought strikes you, or do you back them up to removable media, leaving them for some future time, when you promise yourself you'll sort them out somehow?

I confess, right at the start, that I fall into the last category. I'm a keen DSLR photographer, and I have thousands of images stored in date order on memory sticks and CDs - all waiting for the moment when I have enough time to sort through and delete those that aren't worth keeping.

In days gone by people had photograph albums containing prints of photographs they took on holiday, or of the children growing up, etc., but does anyone do that nowadays? Film and processing costs were quite expensive, but now we can all take as many digital photographs as we like, at virtually no cost. Are they ending up in a way that makes it a pain to show friends and relatives, or to browse through on the spur of the moment?

Please tell, I would like to know if I'm among friends.

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Forum Editor

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Quickbeam

"For a one off £110 I have a 2TB private cloud."

What you have is a hard drive which you can access remotely. It's not Cloud storage at all, although Western Digital refers to it as such. Your files are no more secure than they would be on any other hard drive.

With genuine Cloud storage your files are safe, even if your local hard drive fails. You don't need to leave anything switched on if you go on holiday or travel on business, and all your files are automatically synced to all your computers, all the time.

The vulnerability with Cloud storage is the one we discussed earlier - that some unauthorised person gains access to your files on the remote server, or while they are in transit to and from that server.

You run exactly the same risk when you access files on your WD device via the internet, and you run the same risk that some unauthorised person could gain access to your WD drive.

I much prefer to trust the Microsoft server security system. It's a personal choice, based on my knowledge of how it works. I fully respect your personal choice - we all have to make judgements about our own data security.

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Quickbeam

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Well, I paid my money and took my choice, as you say.

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WhiteTruckMan

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Online storage companies (instagram immediately spring to mind,) moving the goalposts so your stuff becomes their stuff do little to inspire confidence, in my mind. Who knows what little wheezes might be dreamt up by marketing departments in the future?

WTM

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Forum Editor

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WhiteTruckMan

instagram isn't an online storage company, it's a social photo-sharing application.

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interzone55

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Talking about stuff syncing between computers, Google Chrome now syncs bookmarks and passwords, which I'm not sure I like.

Here's an example:

Yesterday I created a blog on Wordpress as part of my photography project, to make life easier I saved the password for the site on my own laptop. Today I'm using my work laptop, which also uses Google Chrome, I log into my wordpress page and the username & password boxes are already completed even though I've never visited the page using this computer.

This must mean that as well as being stored locally, all my cookies must also be saved on Google's servers. So when I run CCleaner to get rid of cookies I'm only cleaning them from my computer, they're still lurking in "the cloud"

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WhiteTruckMan

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FE

If you say so, but many don't have your perspective. I think a lot of people who upload files (for sharing) object when the company they use attempts to purloin their files for profit. I don't think the finer points of definitions as to what is and isnt online storage really enters into it when it comes to trusting a company not to abuse your data. And just to be clear, when I say data I mean digital information in any format, be it picture, text, audio, video or whatever.

WTM

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interzone55

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WhiteTruckMan

I think you are confusing things

Instagram is a social sharing site, the images are available to all

Cloud storage is just that, a repository for your files which are then available to you, and anyone you wish to give access. The files are not generally available to all.

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WhiteTruckMan

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alan14

You're missing the point(s). Which are about online storage companies moving the goalposts, i.e terms and conditions, and people associating one type of company with another. And yes, I do personally know the difference, but I'm saying that I think lots of people either dont know or dont care about the difference.

It all boils down to trust. Will people trust online storage companies to not only keep their data safe, but not to change their own rules to do something completely against the spirit of the original agreement.

Remember the old saw that it's easier to seek forgiveness than ask for permission?

WTM

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interzone55

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WhiteTruckMan

Considering the fact that a study in the past revealed that people were willing to give their passwords away for a bar of chocolate I don't think most people care what happens with their stuff as long as they don't have to pay for the service.

You don't get owt for nowt, so the providers of these "free" services have to make them pay somehow. Google get revenue from targeted adverts, but Facebook have yet to make any real revenue from adverts so they have to find other ways, which they're trying to do without losing too many users

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Forum Editor

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"Will people trust online storage companies to not only keep their data safe, but not to change their own rules to do something completely against the spirit of the original agreement"

Slowly but surely I believe they will. The Microsoft SkyDrive service that I use has been running for five years, and so far, so good. I trust Microsoft because I have no reason not to, and because no company of that size and prominence is going to commit commercial suicide by betraying that trust.

Everyone uses mail servers of some kind - we've been doing it for years - and our mail is stored on servers before it's delivered. I'm not aware of people saying that they don't trust their ISP, or the web host, if they have their own domain name.

The truth is that most people do not have great stacks of highly-confidential files on their hard drives, although to hear therm talk about security you would think they hold the nation's nuclear weapons launch codes. Cloud storage is a very useful way to store your files so that you can access them on multiple computers, anywhere in the world. If you only have one machine, and you rarely need remote access to your stuff there's no point in worrying about it - Cloud storage isn't for you anyway.

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