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How do you store your photographs?


Forum Editor

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In another thread we've been discussing the demise of Jessops, the well-known chain of photographic stores. Reasons for their collapse have generally been agreed to be the changes in the way that people buy cameras, and possibly the fact that phone cameras are nowadays being used by young people as their only way of taking photographs.

I was struck by one of Quickbeam's posts, in which he said (about younger people)

*"When they change phones they don't even keep copies of the photos that were taken on today's iWow phone. The photo content is considered as obsolete as the phone. Which means in 20/30 years time they won't find happy memories of the past at the back of the sock drawer when they find the postcard prints and negatives of holidays taken when they were still slim and fresh faced."*

and I got to wondering how you store your photographic images. Do you archive them on your computer hard drive, looking at them when the thought strikes you, or do you back them up to removable media, leaving them for some future time, when you promise yourself you'll sort them out somehow?

I confess, right at the start, that I fall into the last category. I'm a keen DSLR photographer, and I have thousands of images stored in date order on memory sticks and CDs - all waiting for the moment when I have enough time to sort through and delete those that aren't worth keeping.

In days gone by people had photograph albums containing prints of photographs they took on holiday, or of the children growing up, etc., but does anyone do that nowadays? Film and processing costs were quite expensive, but now we can all take as many digital photographs as we like, at virtually no cost. Are they ending up in a way that makes it a pain to show friends and relatives, or to browse through on the spur of the moment?

Please tell, I would like to know if I'm among friends.

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Forum Editor

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"AND I NEVER, but NEVER delete photos!"

I wish I could say the same, but if I operated that policy I would need huge amounts of storage, most of which would be filled with rubbish images.

I once saw David Bailey being interviewed, and he was asked the classic question: '"Tell me David, what's the secret to taking a great photograph?". David smiled, and said "If I knew the answer to that I would keep it to myself, but I don't know. My secret is to take hundreds of images, and with luck one or two of them will be good. Perhaps one in a thousand will be very good,and perhaps one in five thousand will be a great image".

I've always remembered it, and the advent of digital cameras meant I could take as many pictures as I liked. I delete hundreds, and keep those that I like.

Notice I didn't say "I keep those that are good"!

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pavvi

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The best photographers are usually the ones that self edit themselves. They wouldn't show you their duff stuff. I'm a bit lazy about deleted stuff that isn't good enough. As a consequence I have 4 external drives with photos on them, many of them didn't inspire me to process them, others that were identical to ones that I did process. So I'd say that I don't delete enough. It's a form of quality control.

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Woolwell

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Years ago when I did a photography course I discovered that photographers take many, many shots and delete many. It is knowing what to keep and what to throw away. I don't delete as many as I should.

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interzone55

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Last year we were lucky enough to have a full 20 minute Red Arrows display over Morecambe, it was stunning.

During the 20 minutes I took about 600 photos simply because the only way to operate was to hold down the shutter button and pan with the planes.

Of the 600 I kept perhaps 100, and when edited I probably managed 10 good photos.

I think this one is my favourite - public Facebook Page Link

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Aitchbee

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Yesterday, one of my neices during conversation yesterday, said that some of the photos she took recently on her smartphone, of her friends in a local pub that her late Dad frequented, had smokey smudges on them which she couldn't explain. I had a look. She's convinced that it was the spirit of her Dad.

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Ventad

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Talking about photos in the CLOUD I have just got an email from Microsoft saying they are closing down mesh:-

As a result, we will retire Mesh on February 13, 2013. After this date, some Mesh functions, such as remote desktop and peer to peer sync, will no longer be available and any data on the Mesh cloud, called Mesh synced storage or SkyDrive synced storage, will be removed. The folders you synced with Mesh will stop syncing, and you will not be able to connect to your PCs remotely using Mesh.

So much for safety of material FE.

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Quickbeam

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I'm glad i decided to retain control myself by buying a personal cloud HD. I can't see the internet in general going into administration overnight.

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Forum Editor

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Ventad

"So much for safety of material FE."

There are no file safety issues with this Ventad. Your files are perfectly secure, because of course you still have local copies on your computer.

All Microsoft is doing is to close down a Cloud storage system, and asking its users to move their files across to SkyDrive. You've had plenty of warning, so there's ample time to make the switch.

It's a simple and painless process which is explained quite clearly here

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Forum Editor

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Quickbeam

"I'm glad i decided to retain control myself by buying a personal cloud HD."

You could have had the same degree of control completely free of charge for a 7Gb storage allowance. Additional storage has to be paid for. There are various plans, a 100Gb space costs £32 a year.

Microsoft SkyDrive allows me to upload files as big as 2Gb, and access everything from any computer in the world. If I drop a file into the SkyDrive folder on my desktop it is automatically synced to my SkyDrive cloud storage.

The same file is automatically synced to all my other computers as well - I don't have to do anything.

It's a reliable, secure system that works perfectly. No hardware involved, other than the computer I'm using at the time. I have the security of knowing that anything I drop into the SkyDrive folder on one desktop will appear in the same folder on all my machines, wherever I am.

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Quickbeam

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FE,

But I just don't trust it enough for the reasons that the others gave.

For a one off £110 I have a 2TB private cloud.

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