We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

Jobs online - take it ...or lose your benefits ... ultimatum from Ian Duncan Smith.


Aitchbee

Likes # 0

Ian Duncan Smith is rolling out his online-strategy in the new year to get benefit claimants back to work.

Will it work. Sorry no links at the moment.

Like this post
lotvic

Likes # 0

"now she is in receipt of £140 per fortnight, which as to support herself and young son"

not sure I agree with that either, she will in addition to £71 pwk JSA, also be getting approx £62 pweek Tax Credits for her child and £20 pweek Child Benefit, and will not have any rent or council tax to pay. I make that approx £153 pwk (£306 per fortnight and no Rent or Council Tax to pay)

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

lotvic

The figures you have given are very interesting, and as I had said earlier I have no further information on this persons circumstances, other than what I stated, or how the various benefits or payment system possibly works nowadays.

But as a curiosity question, what happens about rent or council tax, if the person lives in private rented, shared accommodation, with a partner or possibly friends, relations or parent's (who might be in similar unemployed or part employed situation themselves). Or possibly even trying to meet mortgage payments, as an whole or part property owned basis?.

The reason I ask, is due to my own local council's crisis a few years back, when they were going through an exercise of changing their IT equipment and procedures, which ended up as a disaster. People who should have been getting assistance were not getting it, with the end results that some people were evicted from the properties they had at the time. Shelter became involved with some of these cases, and there was at least one £2000 'fine' made against the council by the Local Government Ombudsman service.

Like this post
lotvic

Likes # 0

Rented accommodation, be it either social housing (council or association) or private: Rent is paid up to a weekly £xx limit set by the local council for the area. It is usually paid straight to the landlord, or in some cases of private rent, to the tenant to pay to the landlord.

Council Tax benefit is deducted at source on the bill and bill will reflect any amount left still to be paid. (it is means tested so if your income is over a certain amount you still have a little bit to pay)

Mortgages: You claim for the £ Interest you pay. (not the capital repayment)

Tax Credits are (to all intents and purposes) a new name for income support for dependants. They are means-tested and come in two flavours: contribution based (dependant on your wage earnings in previous tax year) or income based (did not have a job or wage in previous tax year)

You can get a rough guide to the extra benefits on top of the JSA's £71 by filling in the appropriate personal circumstances on this Benefit Calculator it is anonymous - no names or reg required.

Like this post
Chegs ®™

Likes # 0

I have been through the various schemes devised over the years to massage the true unemployment figures,Manpower Services Commision/Vocational assessment etc etc where I recieved £10 pw on top of my benefit,with the promise of employment at the end of the scheme.None of the Employers ever took anyone on after the scheme ended,& one of my old employers used to use my taxis and we'd often chat about job prospects in the area as the various "traditional" employers ceased trading(we did have just 5 main employers when I left school,now we have 1)& I mentioned working for him on a Job Creation Scheme asking if he'd ever intended employing anyone permanently.The answer was a resounding NO.Apparently,these "trainees" allowed him to recieve a cash handout for the training whether he took them on permanently or not.The more "trainees" he had,the more he was paid.

There are also vast differences in wages between north/south of the country and also between city/town so £15k around here would be a good wage(certainly one I'd work for)and the gap is widening.

Various posters to this thread seem to think that ANYONE claiming benefit is a scrounger,and they're an even worse workshy layabout if they dare to discover exactly what they are entitled to claim for and do so.I have unfortunately been a regular customer of the DHSS/DWP/Job Centres as my Employer goes out of business or I'm injured(9 crashes,yet to be at fault in any of them)or the scheme I'm on ended.Twenty years ago,if you were unemployed when given council housing you could claim a grant to furnish the home.I did,for a one-bedroomed flat and was given a grant of £900 but was given information (not by any DHSS staff member)to attend the library & look in "The Local Government Handbook" where I found a list of every item I should claim for.Instead of claiming for Kitchen Utensils (as I'd done) to claim for individual place settings x4,even items like a vegetable brush were in this list.I revisited the DHSS & submitted another revised claim & was given another £1400 grant.These grants are now "Social Fund Loans" and must be repaid,but frequently are not available as there is no money in the "pot" to provide for the loan.This is why so many people will work for less than the legal minimum wage & continue claiming benefits,it's the only way to get sufficient cash to buy essential items like cookers/beds etc.The government insist that these people are prosecuted for fraud,but in many cases it is the only option left open to them as the legal system has failed them due to "no money in the pot" I don't advocate anyone does commit fraud,I'm just pointing out one reason why it could happen.It is only in recent times I recall seeing News stories about Benefit Frauds(but also these people have been stealing many thousands of pounds over years,whilst still being fit enough to run/golf etc & claiming disability)There are many other points in this thread I would comment on (if I had the room) if I could remember them all,but as PCA pages insist on taking several minutes to load since the arrival of an extra toolbar at the bottom of my screen I cannot check back through all the previous pages without it taking me into the New Year.

Like this post
lotvic

Likes # 0

There are many more genuine claimants than the workshy and the system in place (albeit changing from year to year) is to help those genuine claimants. It is the lack of real jobs that is the problem.

I was involved as a volunteer for several years in a charity (also funded by local council grant) helping claimants to fill in forms and advising benefits available. It was surprising how many did not know of the extra benefits available.

I'm not involved now but I try to keep up with the latest changes but it is a losing battle as one scheme seems to be rapidly replaced by another.

Like this post
namtas

Likes # 0

It is the lack of real jobs that is the problem.

lotvic, I hear the phrase you use quite often, but surely all jobs are real to someone if they are being paid a wage for it.

Like this post
lotvic

Likes # 0

namtas, I was referring to the lack of any paid job offers for any of the participants at the end of a 'trainee' scheme with an employer - as mentioned by Chegs ®™

Like this post
spuds

Likes # 0

While we are talking about 'trainee' schemes, perhaps instead of making hints about the employer benefiting more than the trainee, perhaps why might look on the employer's side a little more?.

I have a relative who owned and run three hosiery manufacturing outlets, employing at its peak approximately 200+ people, in various jobs, working full and part time. He was approached about taking on YTS trainees's, and he accepted the challenge. To this day, he will still state that it was one of the worst moves he ever made.

Of the twenty or so trainee's that went through his books, only one was 'fit' to work for him, and did so. The others appeared to have very little regard to learning or work practises. Bad timekeeping, smoking in areas that were totally out of bounds, like fabric storage areas. On one occasion drug taking. A couple of thefts didn't go unnoticed as well. General attitude problems with other employees. The list was endless, which resulted in him totally giving up on the idea, and any future ideas of similar nature being aired by governments.It all became a complete burden, and it was costing him and his other employees, some of whom had been with him for years.

Eventually after many years in the business he sold the business's as a going concern, but retained the properties, joined forces with another party, and went into property development, a far more easier way of earning an honest living. The other problem with the hosiery side was government red tape and cash flow due to retailers wanting the items at their price, and then delaying payments, which he had to cover.

So taking unemployment and employment as an whole, who would want to be a boss?.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

45 Best Android games: top Android games for your smartphone or tablet in 2014 (24 are free!)

IDG UK Sites

How Apple, Adobe, Microsoft and others have let us down over UltraHD and hiDPI screens

IDG UK Sites

Do you have the X-Factor too? Mix Off app puts fans in the frame

IDG UK Sites

iPad Pro release date, rumours and leaked images - 12.9 screen 'coming in 2015'