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Does part time working boost the economy?.


spuds
Resolved

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On a point of curiosity what are your views on job-sharing or part-time working, and does it improve the economy and provide satisfaction for all involved, including those reliant or require those or any services given?.

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spuds

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bremner

Your second paragraph brings to mind a neighbour and friend who runs a food processing factory. At certain times of the year, the company run 24 hour 7 day production systems using mainly agency workers (400+), usually transported in from as far as 40/50 miles away, and at off peak times fully employed in-house staff of about 100, covering an whole range of services.

It makes him very sad to see some people obviously desperate for work, who can be very good and reliable with the tasks given, then he as to 'let them go'. Usually seeing some of the same faces, when the peak troughs arrive throughout the year. Hence using agency workers, which makes the task slightly easier for the company.

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carver

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Since the working tax credit has been changed there are a lot of people who now find that working part time is just not worth it.

They can not afford to work any more, it's not their fault that this pathetic lot of politicians believe that part timers can just ask for more hours and miraculously the extra hours will appear.

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carver

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"People might want to work extra hours in order to buy their second Ferrari"

I do hope you are trying to be witty because other wise you show a complete lack of understanding in the inability of certain people to actually live unless they can work longer hours.

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spuds

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"This is statistical nonsense. People might want to work extra hours to buy their second Ferrari".

Any links to that statistic?.

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spuds

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Perhaps going back onto the main subject of my curiosity. Over my working life to the present time, I have seem many changes on working hours, patterns and peoples contributions, and I think more so in the 'white collar professional' sector.

In the 'professional' field I find that possibly less working hours are perhaps becoming more noticeable. Take for instance your own GP practise, where it might be that appointments are getting more harder to arrange, because the GP you want to see is only working a three day week, or the hospital consultant whose lifestyle is possibly split between NHS and the private sector. That's if you can get to see a particular consultant in the first place. Even my own experiences recently regarding a problem requiring a solicitor, was met with "Sorry they do not work on that day, I'll try and fit you in...". Even my dentist and the vet's we use, have reduced their hours and working patterns, so making it more difficult for the client.

Not long ago, my local councillor was complaining about being woken at 3am one morning, because an elderly lady couldn't get any response from the council's 24 hour emergency service.

Another incident, was a problem with job sharing, and the people involved were not passing on information, leaving the client in confusion as to progress of work in resolving an issue.

Yet it might sound rather daft, but how can these situations really contribute to the economy and the well-being of others and the nation?.

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spider9

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fourm member

If, as you say, the statement " 'Someone is counted as underemployed if they are working fewer hours than they would like.'", is statistical nonsense - then are you are saying that the ONS are producing nonsense by having stupid classifications for their figures? If so, would you advocate shutting down the ONS on the grounds of incompetency?

The reason for workers wanting extra hours is mainly, as Aitchbee said, that not enough full-time jobs are out there. At present there are over 3 million part-time workers who would like more hours, surely not all the wealthy just needing 'Ferrari money'.

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carver

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I think that if I could afford a Ferrari or two then having to work a few extra hours a week wouldn't be one of my main concerns.

Mind you come to think about, it ever since the cleaning lady at my wife's school bought that Ferrari 458 Italia she has been asking if she can work a few extra hours, that must be the sort of person fourm member is thinking about.

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namtas

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I have no idea what it does to the economy but is it not a fact that many people simply cannot get full time jobs and therefore have to have two or more part time jobs to compensate, and is it also a fact that employers find it more tractive to have part time workers as it gives more flexibility. At one time the conditions for part time workers were a lot lower, I don't know if that is still the situation today.

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Bing.alau

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There are certain jobs where it is vital to employ part time workers only such as bar-staff in public houses. In the pub I managed it would have been impossible to employ full time staff to cover the necessary hours. I had 22 part time staff and 1 full time head barman who I rotated hours with. The part timers fitted in when the pub was busy. You can't have ten full time bar-staff hanging about when the pub is empty. So part time staff are a necessity in these type of jobs. Also idea for working mums which most of my staff were.

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spider9

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fourm member

Glad to see your "statistical nonsense" quote has now been transformed into " unhelpful" !!

But it still begs the question as to why we are paying for all these ONS statistics if you consider them 'nonsense or unhelpful'?

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