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Does being a member of UKIP make you a racist?


hssutton

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Does being a member of UKIP make you a racist or support racist policies?

It would appear that certain people in my old home town would think so. Really pleased I left that area many years ago.

Telegraph Report

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Noldi

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The party I voted for in the last election you could say I support but I don't agree with all their policy's. I would be upset if I was judged because I voted a particular party. But these people are members so does that make their views extreme compared to a person who is not a party member but voted for them.

I am not familiar with the adoption system but can the adaptor refuse a child because of prejudice ????

Noldi

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WhiteTruckMan

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Well I think that Nigel Farage got it spot on when he described the actions of Rotherham borough council as “a bloody outrage” and “political prejudice of the very worst kind”. It makes you wonder what other outrageous decisions taken on the grounds of political dogma from either left or right have gone unreported.

WTM

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tryanothername

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Agree with WhiteTruckMan's comment.

I think that Nigel Farage had every right to comment on the matter.

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carver

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"the meaning of 'for example'? " I believe that certain members of this forum have extreme political motives for example "fourm member".

Now this may or not be true but in that statement I have picked out one person as an example, so would you consider this to be fair, bearing in mind that I have not mentioned any other name or group on this forum to base an "example" on.

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Aitchbee

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Forum Editor

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tryanothername

"I think that Nigel Farage had every right to comment on the matter."

Of course he does, in the same way that we all have the right to comment on his apparent bad attack of tunnel vision. This is the man, after all, who would repeal the 1998 Human Rights Act and withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights, were he ever to be in a position to do so. He sees no inconsistency however in wading into this issue on the grounds that the prospective foster parents have had their human rights compromised by Rotherham Council.

Nigel Farage has declared that UKIP would "put an end to the active promotion of the doctrine of multiculturalism by local and national government", yet he wastes no time in championing the cause of European migrant children when he thinks he can score some political points.

I happen to believe that Rotherham Council made the wrong decision in this case, based on what I've read, but Farage's mouth-foaming is hypocrisy of the worst kind - thank goodness someone like him is never going to be in a position of sufficient power to be able to put his misguided policies into action - our culture and our economy would suffer terribly as a result.

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Housten

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Forum Editor,

I have just had some very valuable help with a problm I was having when I saw this thread, and I must disagree with you, to some extent.

For all my life up to a few years ago I had voted Tory, and against not coming out of Europe - although I was totally against going in in the first place - but won't bother with reasons here. The reason I voted that way was because I was stupid enough to believe the statements that were being bandied around, that it would be too expensive to come out. Then cmd promised a referendum and I then thought that we would be much better out of Europe. One of my reasons is that whilst the people on the Continent have had all sorts of wars - just as we British have had - they have also been subjected to invasion and dominance by a foreign power. The British - as we famously state - have not been invaded for a thousand years, and we do not want ANY foreign government or nongovernment organisation having power over us! That is why I switched to UKIP a few years ago as I thought that, as a nation, we were stuck in europe. So if supporting Nigel Farage makes me a racist so be it, I am certain he understands more of what the people of this nation want then any of the so-called 3 main party leaders. I could be wrong, but whilst he wants europeans out of the UK I do not know his attitude to orphan children, and I fail to see why he shouldn't make capital out of something the other 3 parties have jumped on. After all it was his party that caused the children to be removed from the couple in the first place.

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Forum Editor

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Housten

I don't think anyone has suggested that supporting the views of Nigel Farage automatically makes you a racist. As for being 'certain' that Farage "understands more of what the people of this nation want then any of the so-called 3 main party leaders.", if that's the case, I wonder why UKIP has never won a single seat in the House of Commons, and why, in a nation with a population of over 64 million people does UKIP only manage a total membership of around 17,000?

It wasn't UKIP that caused the children to be removed from the couple in the first place, it was Rotherham Council,and as I've already stated, I believe it was a flawed decision if the entire basis for it was that the couple concerned are UKIP party members.

That UKIP has picked up members of late - and it has - is not so much because people are staunch believers in UKIP policies, it's more a case of them being disgruntled with the Tory party. The people who are joining UKIP are, in the main, young and inexperienced. In the past that would have seen them swinging to the Liberal Democrats,but they can't do that now because they see the Lib Dems as a weak, ineffectual party. UKIP is reaping the benefit. Whether the swing is sufficient to have any meaningful implications for the outcome of the next General Election is extremely doubtful; we'll have to wait and see.

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Woolwell

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FE - I am not sure that it is the young and inexperienced that are joining UKIP. This is 6 months old who votes for UKIP but indicates that the largest grouping is 60+.

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Forum Editor

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Woolwell

You misunderstood - I referred to the people who are joining the party, not those who vote for it. Millions of people vote for the Tory and Labour parties without being paid up members.

In the 2010 General Election just 3.1% of the popular vote went to UKIP. In the local elections of May this year the party certainly increased its share of the popular vote, but it didn't translate into seats gained.

On that basis there will have to be an historically unprecedented swing before the claim made by Housten that Nigel Farage "understands more of what the people of this nation want then any of the so-called 3 main party leaders." could be said to even remotely true.

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