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Fibreglass how good is it for insulation.


Ex plorer
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Hi just how good is fibreglass insulation.

I was in the plumbing and heating trade from leaving school in 1962 for around twenty five years. As I live in the dales solid fuel and later oil was the only way to heat our houses.

I remember the first time I insulated a loft with one inch fibreglass.

A few years latter one inch went out and double wrap (one inch doubled over) came in around two inches thick and became the standard insulation.

In later years it was four inch and if I remember right it was two inch just doubled as it could be split into the old two inch with ease.

Then eight inch was introduced as the standard.

Now ten inches when will it stop.

My roof still has vermiculite in the attic a small cork granular substance around three inches and seems to work as snow and frost does stay on the roof.

Fiberglass is messy and cumbersome, and dirty stuff surely there are better products today.

The old four inch was perfect as it sat between the timbers and you could see where you were putting your feet.

Today Wall cladding insulation is only a few inches thick as it is for under floor heating would this not be a better move to the attic.

Why are we still stuck with fiberglass in the lofts getting thicker every several years it takes up space and storage in conventional lofts.

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woodchip

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Slab Insulation

Link

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lotvic

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Good chart on wikipedia, scroll down to Typical per-unit-thickness R-values for material that should help with choosing what to use.

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Forum Editor

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woodchip

"a lot of the slab stuff sold at builders is the best kind if you can get it"

You're talking about This kind of insulation. Celotex is certainly an excellent product - easy to cut and fit, and has a very high insulation value. It's not cheap, however, and for that reason it isn't often used as a standard loft insulation. Millions of square metres of it go into loft conversion walls and roof pitches though.

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woodchip

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FE yes that's the stuff, I used to work for my self nigh on 40 years. But forgot the name of it. I used a lot some in my House as I have 9" solid brick wall to the rear of the property So it acted like a Stud wall Half inch of the stuff was like using 3" of Polystyrene form. But if you remember Isle of Man A leisure complex burned down to the ground as a result of updraught and the form just burning, I cannot remember but some people did lose there lives as a result. if it had been plastered over it would not have burned as it did

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Forum Editor

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wee eddie

Granules are good, but to get enough insulating value you would need to have more depth between the ceiling joists than is normal in an ordinary house. That means that you end up inserting vertical boards at the eaves and covering the joists with granules - it is a fiddly job, and the loft ends up being a no-go area.

My advice would be to bite the bullet and lift the boards in sections, inserting 150mm thick loft insulation as you go. Assuming your joists to be 100mm deep that would mean compressing the insulation as you re-lay the boards, but that's not usually a problem. It would take time, but you'll only do it once, and the result would be worth the effort in terms of the insulation you'll gain.

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Forum Editor

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woodchip

Celotex has a class 'O' fire rating. It complies with current building regulations approved document B in that respect.

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wee eddie

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Woodchip: It was Summerlands Acrylic Roof that burned. Highly flammable

In the late 60's, I produced several statuettes out of moulded Acrylics, only a very few sold, but getting the Acrylic Sheet to the correct temperature, for moulding, was critical. I had several burst into flames, in the oven, when I tried to heat it too quickly.

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Bing.alau

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The mention of fibreglass started me itching all over. I remember getting in to the loft of a married quarter in Gosport to erect an indoor TV aerial. It had the then necessary amount of fibreglass betwixt the joists. Boy did I itch for hours afterwards as I had done it in the lunch hour. It wasn't until about eight o clock at night that I could get in the shower and get rid of some of it. I learned a valuable lesson that day, never hurry any job and double check first that you are properly attired to do it.

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