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Apple V Samsung or Samsung V Apple


carver

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Personally I am getting really fed up with these two because in the long term I and every body else is paying for their sue and counter sue but this proper apology I like.

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wee eddie

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Carver: I think that you are mistaken.

They are actually round with 4 straightened edges!

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carver

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wee eddie hadn't thought of that shape, must brush up on shapes and how to describe them.

Have you have patented that shape yet.

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wee eddie

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Of course, my Solicitors, Messrs' Sue, Grabbit & Run are, at this very moment, sharpening their pencils in the expectation of a considerable, No Fee, No Charge, payout!

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Forum Editor

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Strawballs

"From what I recall it was Apple that started the sueing snowball. Must have been when someone threatened their monopoly to give them some healthy competition!!"

It's helpful to understand that huge amounts of money are at stake in these situations. Both Apple and Samsung invest hundreds of millions of dollars in product design and development, and subtle design differences make big differences to sales figures. Apple has established an unrivalled reputation for innovation, and for designing objects of desire. That flair for design has been largely responsible for the huge sales of devices like the iMac, iPod, and the iPad.

I don't think healthy competition bothers Apple, but what does bother them, and what bothers plenty of other companies too, is when they believe a competitor is piggy backing to success by deliberately copying elements of their registered designs. Reading some of the posts here it's easy to see how a lot of people think it's humorous, this attention to design details, but it's far from that if it means you may sell fewer product units because someone has copied your ideas. Research has demonstrated how customers can be strongly influenced by the look of a device; so much so that in many cases they'll buy something that looks good, even if it isn't technically as capable as a competitor's product. Tiny details can be very important.

All this isn't a new thing - manufacturers have been going to court over such things for decades, the only difference with battles like this one are the amounts of money involved. It's what makes the cases newsworthy.

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