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Speakers Corner


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How not to enjoy a drink


carver
Resolved

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I heard about this on the radio but didn't really hear it properly and thought that some one had pored the stuff into her drink out of spite.

Didn't realise that it's the Wine bar using it in their drinks Liquid nitrogen what sort of idiot puts some thing that is so lethal into a drink and doesn't expect a fatality to occur.

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Forum Editor

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Diemmess

Nitrogen gas, which is what you get when liquid nitrogen boils off at room temperature is harmless. The danger comes when you ingest the liquefied gas and it promptly starts to turn into a gas inside your body - increasing its volume by a factor of around 600. That, and the chance that the extremely cold liquid will create a hole in your stomach wall before it reverts to a gas.

Nitrous Oxide is a different kettle of fish altogether. Nothing to do with the drinking incident in this case.

There are suppliers who routinely sell liquid nitrogen to restaurants, hotels, and commercial kitchens, and they will supply small quantities to anyone who requires it. There's no specific legislation involved - as long as the customer has the required storage and handling equipment the product will be supplied, along with safety information on handling and use.

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Aitchbee

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As a spotty teenager I rememember [over a period of several years] getting plasted (not plastered ... joke) with liquid nitrogen dispensed from a concentrated jet/nozzle under strict medical supervision at my local hospital for the treatment of unsightly acne (keloid) scars. The skin blisters and then peels after a few days then heals. So I have just an inkling as to what this poor girl must have suffered (on the inside) so to speak.

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Aitchbee

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sorry, plasted ...should be blasted.

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Diemmess

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F.E.

Thanks for bringing me up to date with the source of liquid Nitrogen.

I realise that N2O is a totally different substance, but related by the party event and the damage it can do when misused.

The people that suffer these catastrophies are either hedonistic undereducated Hooray Henrys or too often innocents of the try anything once brigade with more money to spend unwisely.

Liquid Nitrogen and perhaps the liquid had all evaporated just leaving a slushy slug which was still capable of severe burning of the stomach blood supply, literally killing much of the stomach wall. Add to that an appalling increase in pressure possibly tearing much of its surrounding.

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Forum Editor

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Diemmess

Nitrous Oxide is certainly causing problems - far more than liquid nitrogen in fact.

It has become a trendy thing to inhale at parties and clubs, mainly from balloons that have been filled from readily available canisters. In America the canisters are called 'Whip-its', I have no idea what they're called in this country.

Users get a couple of minutes of euphoria, but continued use can lead to damage to the central nervous system, and in extreme cases to death - vomiting is common, and there's a risk of inhaling vomit into the lungs, with fatal results.

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yonex24562

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Just read this and as I work in the chemical industry I feel that I must point out that N2 is only harmless as long as there is plenty of oxygen about as well. Take the O2 away and you very quickly have a very dangerous, odourless gas that can kill very quickly and has been the cause of many fatalities in industry over the years. So I reckon that it is not something that should be trifled with.

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Forum Editor

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yonex24562

Thank you for that information.

I believe that most nitrogen-related deaths occur when large amounts of the gas are being used - typically in nitrogen purging of tanks etc. The Nitrogen gas displaces the oxygen, and people can die of asphyxiation. The small amounts used in the context being discussed here wouldn't pose an asphyxiation risk, but as we've heard, the liquefied form can be lethal if ingested.

On the subject of inhaling nitrogen, it's worth remembering that the air we breathe is 78% Nitrogen, and only 28% Oxygen.

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Diemmess

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Hello???

78% + 28% = 106% or it was before I tried breathing N2O

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Forum Editor

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Diemmess

Ah - someone is awake!

You would think that I would read what I typed before posting, wouldn't you?

Of course we all knew that Oxygen figure should be 21%, and for the record, the remainder is composed of argon, and trace amounts of carbon dioxide, neon, helium, methane, krypton, hydrogen, nitrous oxide, xenon, ozone, iodine, carbon monoxide, and ammonia.

Plus a bit of water vapour in various places.

Thanks for the heads up.

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morddwyd

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Many idiots.

It appears it has been going on for some time and is (was) quite widespread.

Up until now the stuff had always evaporated before being ingested.

This poor girl drank a bit too quickly.

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