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Filters on a central heating system


al's left peg

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Hi guys,

Anyone on here have any knowledge / experience of these filters fitted on the return pipe to a boiler?

The common ones are 1) Maganclean, 2) Fernox TF1 and 3) Spirotech Magnabooster.

I have a 10 year old Vokera boiler which is probably in need of replacing, but I have been looking at the items above as a way to arrest sludge build up in the pipe system. They also incorporate magnets to trap any metal fragments which can damage the boiler.

When my central heating is running it makes a bit of noise in the pipe work, and I have been told this is due to sludge in the pipe work. I can testify to this when I remove a radiator and flush it in the back garden with a hose pipe, it runs black for 5 minutes before the water turns clear.

If anybody has any knowledge regarding these filters can you post your views to me on here? I have been looking at a few DIY forums, and for everyone professing how good they are, there is another saying they are not worth the money. I expect at least one reply from the F.E as he seems pretty schooled up in these matters. Regards, Al

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Woolwell

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In any system, old or not, an indication of sludge is that the middle bottom of a radiator fails to warm or has cold spots. A pressurised system will not have a tank in the loft.

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Forum Editor

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Diemmess

Corrosion inhibitors aren't meant to cleanse a system. which is why I mentioned using a flushing agent first. That will clean the pipework, but not as thoroughly as a power flush.

Trianco still makes excellent gravity-fed solid fuel boilers, but boy, are they expensive - £2000 plus for a decent one.

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Ventad

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One of the main causes of sludge in the system is caused by the wrong placement of the pump to the vent pipe, without going into too much detail it (the pump) should be in a neutral position otherwise when the heating/hot water is called for by the timer/thermostats you get what is called pump over, water is sucked down the feed pipe and pushed out through the vent pipe hence pump over. This causes the water splashing into the expansion tank to pick up oxygen which in turn goes around the system causing the deterioration of radiators etc causing the sludge.

It also happens the other way round when the pressure pushes the water up the feed pipe raising the water level when the pump goes off, the water quickly tries to find its own level and can shoot up the vent pipe causing an overspill into the expansion tank. If the expansion tank is overfilled to begin with the water would flow out through the overflow pipe and then new water would top up the tank from the mains( even more oxygen) This you should have noticed by the water escaping via the overflow pipe outside.

You can check if this is happening by one person in the loft looking into the expansion tank and another person turning on the heating/hot water stats for 5mins and then switching off.

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Forum Editor

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ventad

All that only applies if you have a so-called conventional system. Modern combi boilers work on pressurised systems - no vent pipes or expansion tanks involved.

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Ventad

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What's happened to my post answering you FE

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Forum Editor

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ventad

I have no idea I'm afraid. I don't even know which post you're referring to.

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Ventad

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Just back from picking up a G/child.

I answered you (FE) by saying :- That there should be no oxygen in a pressurised system unless there is an undiscovered leak underneath the floor or somewhere and the householder keeps topping up via the mains water link to the boiler and perhaps closed the automatic air valve thereby adding fresh water and not allowing the oxygen to escape.

Also some boiler manufacturers do not like you to put in additives as if you put too much in for the amount of water content it can damage the boiler seals in some cases.

Any oxygen in a new water fill should be vacated by the AAV and radiator bleeds in the first few days so therefore any deteriation of the system should be minimal.

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namtas

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Agree with ventad, the cause of sludge is oxidation, sludge is a mixture but mostly rust corroding from the system, (a very small amount comes from galvanic action) and can only occur when oxygen is present in the water. Apart from pumping over and system make loss losses due to leaks leaks every refill brings in fresh oxygenated water.

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